Anthony W. Orlando

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Anthony W. Orlando is an Assistant Lecturer at the USC Price School of Public Policy and a doctoral candidate working with the Bedrosian Center. He is an op-ed columnist for the Huffington Post. He received a Master's in economic history from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a bachelor's degree in economics from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. His latest book, "Letter to the One Percent," was published in November 2013.
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aorlando@usc.edu
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Articles by Anthony W. Orlando

In Defense of Our Political Party System (Sort Of)”

Did the recent government shutdown cause your confidence in government to soar?

We thought not. Luckily, Anthony spoke with UC San Diego prof Thad Kousser about where gridlock comes from, what to do about it, and whether politicians really deserve all the blame they get.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

Can You Hear Us Shouting into the Void? Here’s How We Do It…and Why

You have a choice. Will you listen to this podcast? Or will you choose one of the other millions of media sources clamoring for your attention? Your brain cells are weighing all sorts of factors, but it’s not easy. The world is increasingly trying to manipulate them, to overwhelm them, and Our American Discourse is smack in the middle of this tug-of-war. You want to know how we compete for your time? Ever wondered what goes on behind-the-scenes? Today, you can find out.

In this episode, Jonathan Schwartz explains how we do what we do every time we broadcast over your smartphone—and how we fight the growing distractions and distortions that loom over the media landscape.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

Let Every Voice Be Heard: How to Elevate the Public Debate in 2018

Our American Discourse is a small piece of a big effort. We’re not the only ones trying to raise the level of public debate in this country. Take a walk through the Price School, and you’ll see room after room of scholars who genuinely care about the public interest. Stop at the Bedrosian Center, and you’ll find the people who have taken it upon themselves to engage directly with the public. That’s where I spend most of my days on campus, and it’s where I want to take you today to meet the leader who makes it all happen…

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

While the World Burns, a More Sustainable Future Is in the Making

At this very moment, wildfires rage across Southern California. These wildfires are only the latest in the increasingly volatile and destructive evidence of change in our climate. But there is hope. Even as the U.S. withdraws from the Paris Agreement – cities, states, and private companies are rushing to fill the void. Sustainability is becoming a win-win-win: environmentally, socially, and financially. The question is, are we too late?

In this episode, Christine Harada gives us an optimism that sustainability can prevail—and tangible proof that we can make it happen right in our own backyard.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

How the Senate Can Beat Gridlock—and Why That’s Not Always a Good Thing

Americans are fed up with gridlock in Congress, one of the least popular institutions in the country. You might think the solution is for legislators to pass major legislation. But what if the solution is even more controversial than the problem? If you’ve heard of “budget reconciliation,” you probably didn’t hear unanimously good things. That’s because it’s a risky game . . . a fascinating, strategic game deep in the trenches of our democratic tug-of-war.

In this episode, Molly E. Reynolds, fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Inst., teaches us how budget reconciliation works, where it came from, how it’s being wielded, and why you should care.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

When Politicians Get Rich and Voters Pay the Price

Voters have long suspected that politicians are corrupt, so much so that they’ve demanded a long list of ethics rules and anti-bribery regulations over the years. But it turns out there are still plenty of tricks left up their sleeves. The question is, do they use those tricks? Do they really have the power to enrich themselves at our expense? Today, we have a wealth of new evidence that finally answers those questions…

In this episode, Jordan Carr Peterson unveils the concerning conclusions of a series of research papers that pull back the veil on the financial interests of our policymakers—and the power they wield in their own favor.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

Imagining a Future That’s Better Than the Past

In this episode, philanthropist Nicolas Berggruen shares his vision of a progressive, cooperative future where people and technology work together to build an inclusive, intelligent society. With “populists” speaking openly about returning to the past, we found someone who’s investing real money to look forward and make a better future.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

The Very First OAD Mixtape

Are you a fan of “Our American Discourse” but missed some episodes along the way? Or maybe you just haven’t been willing to make the time commitment and you want to know if it’s worth it? Then check out this compilation of some of the best moments in our previous episodes. And even if you’ve heard them all, it helps to be reminded just how much we’ve learned and how entertained we’ve been by the guests we’ve been fortunate to interview. With the holiday season just around the corner, think of this mixtape as our gift to you.

This episode features luminaries such as: Lisa Schweitzer, Paul Haaga, Rob Asghar, Gregg Van Ryzin, Jennifer Brinkerhoff, Melissa Bird, Johanna Thunell, and Raphael Bostic.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

Autopsy of a Failed Health Insurance Experiment: Did It Die of Natural Causes, or Was It Murdered?

It was just another week for the Trump administration. A senior official resigned after admitting to major ethics violations, the President insulted millions of innocent brown-skinned Americans on Twitter, and quietly—so quietly that almost no one noticed—the Department of Health and Human Services pulled another Jenga block out of the teetering tower that is the Affordable Care Act. Fortunately, it did not fall.

But it did become more expensive. And in that understated tragedy, we find our mystery: Was that HHS’s intent all along?

This essay was originally published on the “Bill of Health” blog at Harvard Law School.