Atlanta Fed CEO Bostic addresses economic policy, inequality at Price talk

By Matthew Kredell

USC Price School of Public Policy Professor Raphael Bostic returned to campus for the first time since taking leave to assume the role of president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, joining Dean Jack H. Knott for a discussion on the state and direction of the U.S. economy, issues of opportunity and inequality, and good governance.

Knott began the Feb. 5 conversation by asking Bostic – the first African-American to serve as president of a Fed regional bank – to explain what the Fed does. In response, Bostic admitted that perhaps few people understand.

The importance of strong “personal touch” relationships in housing services

by Shawn Flanigan

To learn why the San Diego Housing Commission’s Achievement Academy – a suite of workforce development programs – is effective in supporting families receiving Section 8 vouchers, we continue conducting interviews in our longitudinal data collection with Achievement Academy families. Our conversations have put a spotlight on a key factor: a strong personal touch. The Section 8 recipients highly value the intensive, personal, positive interactions they have with Achievement Academy staff, and almost all of them point to positive outcomes that come from the personal investment of their “caseworkers”.

Congresswoman Bass calls for retraction of FBI report on black identity extremism at USC event

By Matthew Kredell

U.S. Congresswoman Karen Bass spoke at a USC School of Public Policy event on Feb. 2 to raise awareness about an FBI document that she is strongly concerned will lead to police violence against young black activists.Professor Erroll Southers led an open discussion with the Democratic House representative from California in a forum presented by two centers at the Price School — the Safe Communities Institute and the Bedrosian Center on Governance.

Complications and Contradictions in a Changing Neighborhood

by Lisa Bates

The corridor of gleaming high rises along Vancouver and Williams Avenues is a marked change from the early 2000s. When the Housing Authority of Portland (now known as Home Forward) applied for HOPE VI funds for the old Iris Court development, it was known as a rough area. Residents who lived there, or who knew of it by reputation …

Bedrosian Center, Jenkins convene national scholars for ‘Pivotal Politics’ symposium

By Matthew Kredell

Nearly 20 years ago, Stanford Professor Keith Krehbiel wrote a book showing that political parties are less important in legislative-executive politics than previously thought — challenging previous assumptions of American politics and influencing the work of many up-and-coming scholars. USC Price School of Public Policy Provost Professor Jeffery Jenkins was completing graduate school when Krehbiel released Pivotal Politics: A Theory of U.S. Lawmaking in 1998.

The benefits of partnering with local universities

By Dr. Shawn Flanigan

As part of my interdisciplinary freshman Honors course at San Diego State University titled “Housing, Home, and Homeland,” I had my twenty-six students spend several weeks reading and discussing Matthew Desmond’s renowned book Evicted, and then gave them an assignment to code an interview from Access to Opportunity research in San Diego. As a culminating experience, we visited the Monarch School, an innovative K-12 school for homeless youth in downtown San Diego ….

Autopsy of a Failed Health Insurance Experiment: Did It Die of Natural Causes, or Was It Murdered?

It was just another week for the Trump administration. A senior official resigned after admitting to major ethics violations, the President insulted millions of innocent brown-skinned Americans on Twitter, and quietly—so quietly that almost no one noticed—the Department of Health and Human Services pulled another Jenga block out of the teetering tower that is the Affordable Care Act. Fortunately, it did not fall.

But it did become more expensive. And in that understated tragedy, we find our mystery: Was that HHS’s intent all along?

This essay was originally published on the “Bill of Health” blog at Harvard Law School.

Schweitzer, Southers discuss hate speech, policy implications after Charlottesville

USC Price Dean Jack H. Knott was joined by Bedrosian Faculty Affiliates Lisa Schweitzer and Erroll Southers (director of the Safe Communities Institute), in a discussion of the policy implications and responses to racism and extremism after the violence triggered by a white-nationalist rally in the Charlottesville, Virginia last month.

“White supremacy is not a historical construct we get to walk away from. We have to really interrogate how white supremacy informs public policies within the structures of our cities, within education and politics,” said Lisa Schweitzer. Erroll Southers indicated that he considered Charlottesville a pivotal moment for extremism in the country.