City of Inmates

Historian Kelly Lytle Hernández brings us the absorbing history of how authorities in Los Angeles have used imprisonment as a tool to control both labor and migration. Our podcast features host Jeffery Jenkins with guests Robynn Cox, David Sloane, and Danielle Williams.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of City of Inmates click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

White Tears

For our discussion of Hari Kunzru’s White Tears, we return to the question: can America overcome its sin of racism? Or will our collective inability to deal with the consequences of our actions win the day? If you have not read this novel, beware – this podcast it mostly spoilers! We dive into the themes Kunzru explores in this complex novel, relish the strong prose, and question the role of cultural memory and American identity.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of White Tears click the orange arrow in the Soundcloud player here -or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play

Featuring Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro (@AngeMarieH), Aubrey Hicks (@AubreyHi), and David Sloane (@dcsloane53)

Tears We Cannot Stop

Can America overcome its sin of racism? If redemption of sin comes through repentance, can White America meet the demands necessary?

A discussion of Michael Eric Dyson’s Tears We Cannot Stop featuring Richard Flory, Richard Green, and Aubrey Hicks

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of Tears We Cannot Stop click the orange arrow in the Soundcloud player here on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcasts, Soundcloud, or Google Play

White Trash

In White Trash: The 400-year Untold History of Class in America, historian Nancy Isenberg traces white poverty and class from the earliest British settlements through to the 21st century. What she finds is that the mythology of social mobility and classlessness of American Exceptionalism is just that, a myth. By taking a deep dive into a sub-class of Americans, Isenberg hopes that Americans can face a truth about the enduring poverty on inequality that has shaped the American consciousness. That not only do we have classes, but these classes have been built by policies going back to the very reason British citizens came to the colonies. Our discussion of the book looks at where this history contributes to our current political conversation and where it could have been more focused to tell the story in a more cohesive way.

Featuring Aubrey Hicks, Anthony Orlando, Lisa Schweitzer, and John Sonego