The polls speak: the American people are with the dreamers, not with Trump

La Opinion quoted Sherry Bebitch Jeffe of the USC Price School about the likelihood Congress will pass legislation to protect the Dreamers. “Part of the problem is that there is support for the dreamers, but there is not the same level of popular support to maintain the government closure in exchange for the Dream Act and that was…

In Defense of Our Political Party System (Sort Of)”

Did the recent government shutdown cause your confidence in government to soar?

We thought not. Luckily, Anthony spoke with UC San Diego prof Thad Kousser about where gridlock comes from, what to do about it, and whether politicians really deserve all the blame they get.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

USC Forum on Black Identity Extremism

Rep. Bass to discuss the FBI and Black Identity Extremism with Homegrown Violet Extremism (HVE) expert Dr. Erroll Southers

The USC Safe Communities Institute and the USC Bedrosian Center on Governance invite you to a conversation on the ramifications of the FBI assessment on Black Identity Extremism (BIE). Thursday, December 21st 6pm to 7:30pm at Ralph & Goldy Lewis Hall, USC, room 101

Bedrosian Center, Jenkins convene national scholars for ‘Pivotal Politics’ symposium

By Matthew Kredell

Nearly 20 years ago, Stanford Professor Keith Krehbiel wrote a book showing that political parties are less important in legislative-executive politics than previously thought — challenging previous assumptions of American politics and influencing the work of many up-and-coming scholars. USC Price School of Public Policy Provost Professor Jeffery Jenkins was completing graduate school when Krehbiel released Pivotal Politics: A Theory of U.S. Lawmaking in 1998.

How the Senate Can Beat Gridlock—and Why That’s Not Always a Good Thing

Americans are fed up with gridlock in Congress, one of the least popular institutions in the country. You might think the solution is for legislators to pass major legislation. But what if the solution is even more controversial than the problem? If you’ve heard of “budget reconciliation,” you probably didn’t hear unanimously good things. That’s because it’s a risky game . . . a fascinating, strategic game deep in the trenches of our democratic tug-of-war.

In this episode, Molly E. Reynolds, fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Inst., teaches us how budget reconciliation works, where it came from, how it’s being wielded, and why you should care.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

PIPE Workshop: Melinda Ritchie, UC Riverside

Legislators as Lobbyists Policy is produced by elected and unelected officials and through the interactions of branches of government. We consider how such interactions affect policy outcomes and representation. We argue that legislators try to influence bureaucratic decisions through direct communication with federal agencies, and that such contact is effective and has consequences for policy…

Governance Salon: Molly Reynolds, Brookings Institution

“Beyond Policy: Procedural Politics in Today’s Congress” Members of Congress often talk about congressional procedure in principled terms. However, political scientists have long argued that questions about the rules are really questions about who has power in the chamber and what policy outcomes can they produce with it.  This dynamic has been in the spotlight…

Federalism and the Battle for Partisan Power

We think we know how federalism works. Republicans believe in states’ rights, and Democrats want a strong federal government, right? Not so fast. New research reveals a whole different tug of war playing out on Capitol Hill. Our legislators don’t always do what they say, but they do have a strategy to design and implement our laws. It turns out that federalism is ground zero in their battle for partisan power—and now we finally know how the game is being played.

In this episode, we go behind-the-scenes with the researcher who uncovered these terms of engagement, Pamela Clouser McCann.

Election scholars explain how random campaign audits can increase transparency for voters

By Matthew Kredell The USC Price School of Public Policy’s Bedrosian Center on Governance hosted a research seminar on Feb. 1 discussing the policy implications of the Federal Election Commission audit program and how increased transparency can inform the electorate. Christian Grose of the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and Abby Wood…