Tully

We’re serious. This podcast has spoilers!

Go see Tully, then listen to our conversation on motherhood, nostalgia, and film-making, featuring host Erroll Southers and guests Alex Ago, Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro, and Lt. Col. Olivia Nelson.

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of The Post click the arrow in the player at the top of this post. Or download and subscribe through Apple PodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play.

The Post

Chronicling The Washington Post’s publishing of the Pentagon Papers during the tail end of the Vietnam War and starring Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep – does The Post accurately portray this important time in American History where the very nature of the First Amendment and National Security seemed in direct contrast?

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of The Post click the arrow in the player at the top of this post. Or download and subscribe through Apple PodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play.

Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Our nerd quotient is rising with the discussion of Star Wars: The Last Jedi.

Listen now to our nerdy discussion of the continuing saga of Luke, Leia, Kylo, Rey, Poe, Finn, and new characters we meet along the way.

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of Star Wars: The Last Jediclick the arrow in the player on this post. Or download and subscribe through Apple PodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play.

Darkest Hour

Gary Oldman is Winston Churchill in the new WWII film, Darkest Hour.

The first month of Churchill’s historic time as Prime Minister, he faced a great decision; one that would lead either to war or to a negotiated peace with Hitler. The compressed timeline of the film drops the viewer in the midst of the “darkest hour” of British history. The decisions made during these days could have changed the course of history.

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of Mudboundclick the arrow in the player on this post. Or download and subscribe through Apple PodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play.

Democracy in Chains

In Democracy in Chains, MacLean delves in the history of Nobel Prize winning economist James Buchanan’s partnership with the Koch brothers to spread the theory of public choice economics. She argues the relationship was formed in order to harness political influence for a small majority of propertied individuals over the will of the majority. The book, while short listed for the National Book Award, met with sharp criticism from conservative think tanks.

Find out what our panel of political scientists, economics, and lawyers think of this controversial work.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of Democracy in Chainsclick the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

Blade Runner 2049

Is Blade Runner 2049 the sequel we didn’t know we needed? Set in a dystopian future Los Angeles, Ryan Gosling’s K is a replicant who hunts down dis-loyal replicants: a Blade Runner. When a secret is uncovered, he sets out on a quest. The journey becomes one to not only find the secret but to answer some of the fundamental questions. What does it mean to be alive, to be human?

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of Blade Runner 2049 click the orange arrow in the Soundcloud player at the top of this post. Or download and subscribe through Apple PodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play.

Slow Philosophy & The Slow Professor

Inspired by the article, “In Praise of Slowness,” in the Los Angeles Review of Books, we decided to look at two books: The Slow Professor by Maggie Berg and Barbara K. Seeber and Slow Philosophy by Michelle Boulous Walker. What might happen if we gave ourselves time (and permission) to understand and learn, rather than, or in addition to, acquire more and more skills? Is slowness the nature of wisdom?

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of The Slow Professor and Slow Philosophy click the orange arrow in the Soundcloud player here on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcasts, Soundcloud, or Google Play

Policy at the Playhouse

Theatre can bolster the status quo. It can foment revolution. It can make us question our identities and the identities of those around us. It makes us yearn and strive. It gives us closure, it leaves us wanting more. Theatre is a weapon. It holds up a mirror. It is politics. Theatre dissolves the distance between people. Theatre exposes humanity and inhumanity. Theatre connects us.

The Policy at the Playhouse podcast features conversations about how art, theater in particular, is an integral part of our civic lives, allowing us to question and inform our conceptions of citizenship and community.

Listen to individual episodes on the player here, the Policy at the Playhouse page, or subscribe at iTunes, Soundcloud, or Google Play.