City of Inmates

Historian Kelly Lytle Hernández brings us the absorbing history of how authorities in Los Angeles have used imprisonment as a tool to control both labor and migration. Our podcast features host Jeffery Jenkins with guests Robynn Cox, David Sloane, and Danielle Williams.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of City of Inmates click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

Nathan Masters on LOST LA and mining LA’s digital archives

This conversation with Nathan Masters, like LA’s history, is wholly engrossing and because of its topic, touches on all of our themes this season, preservation, resistance, healing, and transformation. Because why study history at all if we are not to concern ourselves with the larger cultural-philosophical questions?

For more information and to find links to some of the things we talk about check out the showpage.

Stream the interview here on this page, or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play.

Schweitzer, Southers discuss hate speech, policy implications after Charlottesville

USC Price Dean Jack H. Knott was joined by Bedrosian Faculty Affiliates Lisa Schweitzer and Erroll Southers (director of the Safe Communities Institute), in a discussion of the policy implications and responses to racism and extremism after the violence triggered by a white-nationalist rally in the Charlottesville, Virginia last month.

“White supremacy is not a historical construct we get to walk away from. We have to really interrogate how white supremacy informs public policies within the structures of our cities, within education and politics,” said Lisa Schweitzer. Erroll Southers indicated that he considered Charlottesville a pivotal moment for extremism in the country.

The Originalist

John Strand’s The Originalist shines a light onto a polarizing Supreme Court Justice; Antonin Scalia. When a bright, liberal law school graduate embarks on a nerve-wracking clerkship with Justice Scalia, she discovers him to be both an infuriating sparring partner and an unexpected mentor.

Listen as Jody David Armour, Oliver Mayer, Jon Sonego, and Jade Wheeler delve into the politics of individual court members, Originalism, civil rights, civic duty, and what it means to be an American.

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of The Originalist, click the arrow in the Soundcloud player at the top of this post. Or download and subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, or Google Play.

Hidden Figures

This episode of the Price Projection Room features a conversation on the popular film, Hidden Figures directed by Theodore Melfi and starring the dream team of Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, among many others.

We discuss how the film both illustrated the racial divide in America while showcasing the work & struggle of African American women. Though we all have some criticism of the work, in the end it may be the representation of strong, smart black women that matters the most.

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of Hidden Figures click the arrow in the player on this post. Or download and subscribe through ApplePodcasts, Soundcloud, or Google Play.

The Underground Railroad

*Warning: Spoilers!*

In Colson Whitehead’s award winning novel The Underground Railroad, Cora, daughter and granddaughter of slaves, flees her plantation after a horrific punishment. She heads out with a fellow slave Caesar, who takes her to the underground railroad – in this novel, a real RR. She is passionately pursued by Ridgeway, a slave catcher while she experiences the horrors of American racism and the courage of the RR personnel. The book compares a mythological Southern narrative of slavery with Cora’s truths and Ridgeway’s version of the “American imperative.” Beautifully written, full of horrific incidents, the book reminds us of the power of racism, the government’s complicity in its implementation and persistence, and reminds us freed African Americans carried with them the legacy of violence, oppression, suppression, and more violence whether from the police, physicians, or any other institution.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of The Underground Railroad click the orange arrow in the Soundcloud player here – or you can download it and subscribe through iTunes, Soundcloud, or Google Play

White Trash

In White Trash: The 400-year Untold History of Class in America, historian Nancy Isenberg traces white poverty and class from the earliest British settlements through to the 21st century. What she finds is that the mythology of social mobility and classlessness of American Exceptionalism is just that, a myth. By taking a deep dive into a sub-class of Americans, Isenberg hopes that Americans can face a truth about the enduring poverty on inequality that has shaped the American consciousness. That not only do we have classes, but these classes have been built by policies going back to the very reason British citizens came to the colonies. Our discussion of the book looks at where this history contributes to our current political conversation and where it could have been more focused to tell the story in a more cohesive way.

Featuring Aubrey Hicks, Anthony Orlando, Lisa Schweitzer, and John Sonego

A Conversation with Journalist Pilar Marrero: Toxic Immigration Rhetoric and America’s Future

Last Wednesday, we had the pleasure of welcoming journalist Pilar Marrero for a conversation with our own Sherry Bebitch Jeffe about toxic immigration rhetoric and the 2016 Presidential Election. Pilar Marrero is an immigration expert; she’s been covering social and political issues pertaining to the Latinx community in the U.S. for over 20 years. She…

Dream Cities: Seven Urban Ideas That Shape the World

Wade Graham’s latest book Dream Cities: Seven Urban Ideas That Shape the World is ostensibly about the architects the seven big ideas that have shaped contemporary cities across the world. Our discussion centers on whether Graham has fulfilled that mission or whether he’s trapped in the confines of an under 350 page book for this massive introduction to urban planning and city history. The answer may lie in the reader rather than the book, listen to the conversation for a lively jaunt through recent architectural history.