Is Solidifying Borders the Answer to the Migrant Crisis in Europe?

2nd year MPP candidate, Robyn Burleson, tackles the growing refugee crisis in this overview piece.

The European Union is struggling to mitigate Europe’s refugee crisis as migrants flee civil wars and poverty in Syria, Iraq, and other nations caught up in domestic upheavals. Approximately 60 million people have been displaced because of conflicts around the world, the largest number of displaced people since World War 2. More than one million migrants traveled to Europe in 2015 alone, and Syria is the largest source of those refugees. The numbers of refugees continue to climb as civil wars escalate, and the majority of the migrants are arriving in Greece, Italy, and Turkey.

Duquette measuring philanthropy in the face of rising income inequality

The trend of rising income inequality in the United States has been well-chronicled; however, the silver lining to that sobering direction is that the wealthy give more to charities when income inequality is high. At least that was the traditional theory that USC Price School of Public Policy Assistant Professor Nicolas Duquette brought to his…

Contesting the Streets II – Panel Discussion (Highlights)

Highlights from the “Contesting the Streets II: Vending and Public Space in Global Cities” symposium at the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy.

“Contesting the Streets II: Vending and Public Space in Global Cities” – Sponsored by SLAB, the Spatial Analysis Lab at USC Price; The César E. Chávez Department for Chicana/o Studies at UCLA, and the USC Bedrosian Center on Governance.

From the Feel Good City to the Just City – Keynote by Margaret Crawford

Margaret Crawford gave this keynote address at Contesting the Streets II, on October 2, 2015.

This symposium brings together scholars and practitioners in dynamic dialogue about the global trends and controversies over vending in public space.

Sponsored by SLAB, the Spatial Analysis Lab at USC Price; The César E. Chávez Department for Chicana/o Studies at UCLA, and the USC Bedrosian Center on Governance.

Courting Justice in California

Aside from robust voter turnout in last week’s city election, the most positive result of protests in Ferguson over policing practices may be attention to inequities in other parts of its criminal-justice system. Accounts by the Washington Post and last month’s Department of Justice report about Ferguson have called attention to the ways that law enforcement…

Worst in Governance is Missouri Governor Jay Nixon

Worst in Governance

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon

Governance Tuesday 12.9.2014That courts in Ferguson, MO, and New York failed to indict police officers in recent deaths of two unarmed African-American men was sadly a surprise to very few. Recent months have shown that the list of unarmed Black men slain by police is more than just Michael Brown in Ferguson and Eric Garner in Staten Island, New York. Recent months have included Akai Gurley in Brooklyn, 12-Year-Old Tamir Rice in Cleveland, and Ezell Ford in Los Angeles, among others. According to a recent ProPublica analysis of federal data on fatal police shootings from 2010 to 2012, Black teens are a staggering 21 times more likely to be killed by police than their white peers.

Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty

In this inaugural edition of the Bedrosian Book Club podcast, four of our faculty discussed Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, the French economics book on inequality that is taking the world by storm. Already 9 weeks on the New York Times Hardcover Nonfiction Bestseller list, the book looks at the history of wealth distribution and predicts worsening inequality. The faculty discuss this 600 page behemoth in two parts.

Listen through the player here, or subscribe on iTunes, Soundcloud, or Google Play.