Radical Markets

In Radical Markets, Eric A. Posner and E. Glen Weyl envision new rules for markets in order to limit the tyranny of monopolies and majority rule. Their aim, with 5 revolutionary ideas to cure what they see as the most important issue of our time: inequality.

What are some of these “radical” ideas, and does our panel think they are the revolutionary ideas we need?

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of Radical Markets, click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

First annual political institutions, economy conference highlights cross-disciplinary collaboration

With the goal of fostering cross-disciplinary synergies among political economy scholars and fill the need for a regular meeting place, the USC PIPE Collaborative hosted the First Annual Political Institutions and Political Economy Conference on March 15-16, convening major U.S. scholars from political science, economics, and law to cover important new research on topics such as the unilateral presidency, Congressional committees, city policies, electoral rules, political leadership, and partisanship.

Ender’s Game

When you’ve grown up thinking everything is a zero sum game … what happens when you learn it isn’t?

New episode features host Jeffery Jenkins with guests Aubrey Hicks, Matt Schauer, and Ehsan Zaffar.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of the “Ender’s Game” episode click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

New paper: Distributive politics and congressional voting: public lands reform in the Jacksonian era

New paper published: “Distributive politics and congressional voting: public lands reform in the Jacksonian era” by Sean Gailmard, Jeffery A. Jenkins

During the 1830s, Congress passed a series of laws reforming U.S. policy on acquiring public lands. These laws established a federal land policy of preemption, under which squatters on public land obtained legal title to it in exchange for payment of a minimum (and low) price per acre. Preemption significantly liberalized the terms of land ownership in the U.S. We analyze roll call voting on the preemption acts in Congress from a distributive politics perspective …

Killers of the Flower Moon

Host Jeffery Jenkins (@jaj7d) is joined by guests Richard Green (@keynesianr), Lisa Schweitzer (@drschweitzer), and David Treuer (@DavidTreuer) to discuss David Grann’s Killers of the Flower Moon.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of the “Killers of the Flower Moon” episode click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

Democracy in Chains

In Democracy in Chains, MacLean delves in the history of Nobel Prize winning economist James Buchanan’s partnership with the Koch brothers to spread the theory of public choice economics. She argues the relationship was formed in order to harness political influence for a small majority of propertied individuals over the will of the majority. The book, while short listed for the National Book Award, met with sharp criticism from conservative think tanks.

Find out what our panel of political scientists, economics, and lawyers think of this controversial work.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of Democracy in Chainsclick the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

Bedrosian Center, Jenkins convene national scholars for ‘Pivotal Politics’ symposium

By Matthew Kredell

Nearly 20 years ago, Stanford Professor Keith Krehbiel wrote a book showing that political parties are less important in legislative-executive politics than previously thought — challenging previous assumptions of American politics and influencing the work of many up-and-coming scholars. USC Price School of Public Policy Provost Professor Jeffery Jenkins was completing graduate school when Krehbiel released Pivotal Politics: A Theory of U.S. Lawmaking in 1998.

All the President’s Men (40th Anniversary Edition)

Bernstein and Woodward published All the President’s Men a mere three months before Nixon’s resignation. We’re revisiting (or visiting for the first time) this classic work of political journalism in the wake of the many callbacks since the 2016 Presidential election. Are dirty tricks just part of politics? What role does the press play? Are there parallels to the Trump administration?

Featuring host Jeffery Jenkins (@jaj7d ‏), and guests Aubrey Hicks (@AubreyHi), Lisa Schweitzer (@drschweitzer), and Donnajean Ward (@DonnajeanWard).

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of All the President’s Men click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!