Bonus- Cop in the Hood (part 2)

In part 2 of our discussion of Cop in the Hood by Peter Moskos, we discuss the notion of discretion in the legal system – by police all the way to prosecutors & parole/probation boards. We think about discrimination in enforcement made possible by discretion. We think about conflicts of interest in investigations of police misconduct – especially in relation to the war on drugs. How should we move forward?

The Ethics of Governing

PhD candidate Anthony Orlando discusses the “Ethics of Democracy” in the latest episode of Our American Discourse.

Democracy is a dialogue. It requires our leaders to ask, to listen, and to react. Good governance thus hinges on conversation and consent—and whether we like it or not, conflict. Planners and policymakers have to balance competing needs, never more so than in today’s polarized environment. How do they do the right thing? Does such a thing even exist? Citizenship demands that we engage with these uncomfortable questions, especially in this troubled era.

Listen to this episode of Our American Discourse by clicking on the orange play arrow on this post, or subscribe at iTunes, Soundcloud, Google Play, or anywhere you listen to podcasts.

Courting Justice in California

Aside from robust voter turnout in last week’s city election, the most positive result of protests in Ferguson over policing practices may be attention to inequities in other parts of its criminal-justice system. Accounts by the Washington Post and last month’s Department of Justice report about Ferguson have called attention to the ways that law enforcement…

Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty

In this inaugural edition of the Bedrosian Book Club podcast, four of our faculty discussed Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, the French economics book on inequality that is taking the world by storm. Already 9 weeks on the New York Times Hardcover Nonfiction Bestseller list, the book looks at the history of wealth distribution and predicts worsening inequality. The faculty discuss this 600 page behemoth in two parts.

Listen through the player here, or subscribe on iTunes, Soundcloud, or Google Play.