Nathan Masters on LOST LA and mining LA’s digital archives

This conversation with Nathan Masters, like LA’s history, is wholly engrossing and because of its topic, touches on all of our themes this season, preservation, resistance, healing, and transformation. Because why study history at all if we are not to concern ourselves with the larger cultural-philosophical questions?

For more information and to find links to some of the things we talk about check out the showpage.

Stream the interview here on this page, or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play.

LA, OC Rent Increases To Continue Into 2019

CBS News Los Angeles affiliate KCBS-TV featured research by Richard Green of the USC Lusk Center that predicts rents across Los Angeles will rise by $136 per month by 2019. Demand for housing continues to increase with job and population growth, but Los Angeles housing development has failed to keep pace with this trend. The…

Southern California apartment rents will keep climbing

Los Angeles Times featured research by Richard Green of the USC Lusk Center and the annual USC Casden Real Estate Economic Forecast that predicts rents across Los Angeles will rise by $136 per month by 2019. Demand for housing continues to increase with job and population growth, but Los Angeles housing development has failed to…

Sloane delivers keynote at Hollywood Economic Development Summit

USC Price School of Public Policy Professor David Sloane provided the closing keynote for the 2017 Hollywood Economic Development Summit, hosted June 22 by the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce at ArcLight Cinemas Hollywood.

The theme of the summit was building a more livable Hollywood, and Sloane noted the unique challenges Hollywood faces in planning for a city that is both a global brand and a Los Angeles community.

The Path Forward: Where Do We Go From Here?

Read Raphael Bostic’s last post in our partnership with Home Matters.

We have a long history of mobility. It’s one of the advances that set the New World apartfrom the Old. Our founders wanted us to move. They didn’t want us confined to the class we were born into or the name we were given or the land our parents could bestow on us. They wanted us to set out across this vast continent, and they didn’t want us to settle until we found a home we could call our own.

The Kingdom

Peter Berg’s The Kingdom is an action procedural which tries also to be a lesson in cross-cultural tolerance. Released in 2007, we wonder if this film makes the same amount of sense after ten years. The film follows an FBI team which travels to infiltrate and find a terrorist cell in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia following an attack killing many American citizens (as well as fellow FBI agent). If art is an imitation of life, have we moved on in the last ten years, or does this remain salient?

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of The Kingdom click the arrow in the player at the top of this post. Or download and subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, or Google Play.

The Hotel Play

On April 29, 1992, Los Angeles erupted into chaos and violence after four white police officers were acquitted in the beating of African American Rodney King. The Hotel Play asks what, if anything, has changed in the past 25 years?

Join Jody David Armour, Paula Cizmar, Aubrey Hicks, and David Sloane as we think about race, Los Angeles, art, and social movements. We look at the moment that was the uprising in 1992 and how community organizing that grew out of that moment became a movement.

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of The Hotel Play, click the arrow in the Soundcloud player at the top of this post. Or download and subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, or Google Play.

Community Engagement Post #4: On social media and online engagement

In our previous post on community engagement, we talked a lot about innovation and how to make citizen engagement more attractive for community members. Additionally, during our first LA Civics Initiative workshop, we talked about the barriers that prevent people from becoming civically engaged in LA. One of the barriers that our attendees pointed to was a certain disconnect or feeling of apathy from Angelenos towards government or other formal institutions. Could online engagement and social media be the keys to making communities feel more interested and connected to local governance and decision-making?

Community Engagement Post #3: On informing and educating the public, and innovation

One of the barriers discouraging civic involvement identified in our LA Civics Initiative kick-off workshop last year was “baseline knowledge”—the idea that people need to be informed and educated in certain issues and processes in order for them to fully engage and participate. It is no surprise that Sherry Arnstein writing on citizen participation in…

Community Engagement Post #2: On being genuine and building trust

Building trust is paramount for genuine community engagement

As I mentioned in our first community engagement post, Arnstein’s article on citizen participation (1969) shows us that there are wrong and illegitimate ways to do community or stakeholder engagement. In my research and my classes at Price, I’ve found that the first step to a legitimate process seems to be a legitimate desire by the engager to listen to the stakeholders and take their input into account when making decisions.