Bedrosian Center, Jenkins convene national scholars for ‘Pivotal Politics’ symposium

By Matthew Kredell

Nearly 20 years ago, Stanford Professor Keith Krehbiel wrote a book showing that political parties are less important in legislative-executive politics than previously thought — challenging previous assumptions of American politics and influencing the work of many up-and-coming scholars. USC Price School of Public Policy Provost Professor Jeffery Jenkins was completing graduate school when Krehbiel released Pivotal Politics: A Theory of U.S. Lawmaking in 1998.

Autopsy of a Failed Health Insurance Experiment: Did It Die of Natural Causes, or Was It Murdered?

It was just another week for the Trump administration. A senior official resigned after admitting to major ethics violations, the President insulted millions of innocent brown-skinned Americans on Twitter, and quietly—so quietly that almost no one noticed—the Department of Health and Human Services pulled another Jenga block out of the teetering tower that is the Affordable Care Act. Fortunately, it did not fall.

But it did become more expensive. And in that understated tragedy, we find our mystery: Was that HHS’s intent all along?

This essay was originally published on the “Bill of Health” blog at Harvard Law School.

Federalism and the Battle for Partisan Power

We think we know how federalism works. Republicans believe in states’ rights, and Democrats want a strong federal government, right? Not so fast. New research reveals a whole different tug of war playing out on Capitol Hill. Our legislators don’t always do what they say, but they do have a strategy to design and implement our laws. It turns out that federalism is ground zero in their battle for partisan power—and now we finally know how the game is being played.

In this episode, we go behind-the-scenes with the researcher who uncovered these terms of engagement, Pamela Clouser McCann.

McCann’s new book uncovers partisanship when Congress delegates policy to states

By Matthew Kredell Ever since she worked for a state-level agency before attending graduate school, USC Price Assistant Professor Pamela McCann has been intrigued by when and why Congress chooses to delegate to the states for implementation of federal policy. In her new book The Federal Design Dilemma: Congress and Intergovernmental Delegation (Cambridge University Press),…

Pam McCann research update: House & Senate negotiations and policy choice

Pamela Clouser McCann, Ph.D., assistant professor at the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy discussed updates to her research on House and Senate negotiations and policy choice. Legislators encode their policy choices in the text of bills they propose, debate, and pass. This text, and the policy choices within it, reflect the preferences of the members whose support…

McCann 2016 roundtable “Why Do We Have No Theory of Policy Implementation?” is MPSA’s featured podcast this month!

The MPSA newsletter featured audio recording of Pamela Clouser McCann‘s 2016 MPSA roundtable discussion. MPSA Roundtable: Why Do We Have No Theory of Policy Implementation? Leading scholars discuss why, when a multiplicity of theories regarding the process of implementing exist, we have no grand theory of policy implementation. Pamela Clouser McCann, University of Southern California,…