USC Price student-led forum focuses on issues of identity, resistance

“In order for us to be inclusive, we need to really highlight that representation matters and include as many people, organizations, thought processes and concerns that people may have,” said Malaika Merid, a second-year Master of Public Policy Student at USC Price who was one of the event organizers. “This is a gathering space of real diverse thought, and I think that the best way for us to move forward with that is to keep creating ways to find more diversity of thought to be included within the forum.”

Trump Makes California Grate Again

Fox & Hounds Daily published commentary by Sherry Bebitch Jeffe of the USC Price School and Doug Jeffe on the continued tension between President Donald Trump and the majority of California voters. All in all, besides lousy traffic, Trump’s visit meant little to most Californians. And the optics of the military and the “wall” didn’t…

Edwin Bender column: Wanted: civic courage

Richmond Times-Dispatch cited research by Abby Wood (USC Gould) and colleagues that found disclosure of signatures on a ballot measures does not chill free speech. New cutting-edge studies by scholars, including Abby Wood of University of Southern California and Douglas Spencer of the University of Connecticut, are beginning to provide the type of evidence Justice Thomas…

New paper: Distributive politics and congressional voting: public lands reform in the Jacksonian era

New paper published: “Distributive politics and congressional voting: public lands reform in the Jacksonian era” by Sean Gailmard, Jeffery A. Jenkins

During the 1830s, Congress passed a series of laws reforming U.S. policy on acquiring public lands. These laws established a federal land policy of preemption, under which squatters on public land obtained legal title to it in exchange for payment of a minimum (and low) price per acre. Preemption significantly liberalized the terms of land ownership in the U.S. We analyze roll call voting on the preemption acts in Congress from a distributive politics perspective …

In Defense of Our Political Party System (Sort Of)”

Did the recent government shutdown cause your confidence in government to soar?

We thought not. Luckily, Anthony spoke with UC San Diego prof Thad Kousser about where gridlock comes from, what to do about it, and whether politicians really deserve all the blame they get.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

The Politics of #HimToo

In an op-ed posted in The New York Times by a contributing writer,  Abby Wood, USC Gould School, was quoted on the standard of acceptable behavior established by the Democratic Party. I’m struck by where the Democrats drew this line. Suppose they had drawn it somewhere between the allegations against Rep. John Conyers and those…

How the Senate Can Beat Gridlock—and Why That’s Not Always a Good Thing

Americans are fed up with gridlock in Congress, one of the least popular institutions in the country. You might think the solution is for legislators to pass major legislation. But what if the solution is even more controversial than the problem? If you’ve heard of “budget reconciliation,” you probably didn’t hear unanimously good things. That’s because it’s a risky game . . . a fascinating, strategic game deep in the trenches of our democratic tug-of-war.

In this episode, Molly E. Reynolds, fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Inst., teaches us how budget reconciliation works, where it came from, how it’s being wielded, and why you should care.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

When Politicians Get Rich and Voters Pay the Price

Voters have long suspected that politicians are corrupt, so much so that they’ve demanded a long list of ethics rules and anti-bribery regulations over the years. But it turns out there are still plenty of tricks left up their sleeves. The question is, do they use those tricks? Do they really have the power to enrich themselves at our expense? Today, we have a wealth of new evidence that finally answers those questions…

In this episode, Jordan Carr Peterson unveils the concerning conclusions of a series of research papers that pull back the veil on the financial interests of our policymakers—and the power they wield in their own favor.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

How to fight extremist hate and violence? Start by pulling out politics, experts say

The Orange County Register covered the USC Price School’s Safe Communities Institute’s conference on how to combat homegrown violent extremism. The event included speeches and discussions by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, a former jihadist and former white supremacist among others. “We cannot arrest our way out of this problem,” said Erroll Southers, director of…