Schweitzer, Southers discuss hate speech, policy implications after Charlottesville

USC Price Dean Jack H. Knott was joined by Bedrosian Faculty Affiliates Lisa Schweitzer and Erroll Southers (director of the Safe Communities Institute), in a discussion of the policy implications and responses to racism and extremism after the violence triggered by a white-nationalist rally in the Charlottesville, Virginia last month.

“White supremacy is not a historical construct we get to walk away from. We have to really interrogate how white supremacy informs public policies within the structures of our cities, within education and politics,” said Lisa Schweitzer. Erroll Southers indicated that he considered Charlottesville a pivotal moment for extremism in the country.

Sports and Racial Justice in America

To some, it represents the highest ideals of our society. To others, it is a symbol of unfulfilled potential at best, outright oppression at worst. Are we referring to the American flag? Or to American sports? This debate is about more than one athlete or one gesture. It is about an institution, a system of competition, dominance, and deeply ingrained beliefs. In this episode, we examine this balance of power—and the protestors who are trying to change it. In front of a live audience at the USC Gould School of Law, Prof. Jody David Armour interviews ESPN writer Jason Reid about Colin Kaepernick, political activism, and being black in America.

Special thanks to the USC Gould School of Law for sponsoring this event and allowing us to record as part of this ongoing series of conversations bringing you the smartest minds from the University of Southern California and beyond, wrestling with the defining challenges of our time.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play.

Get Out

Get Out follows a young African-American photographer on a visit to his white girlfriend’s parents’ home. The tag line sums up the deep horror of the film, “Just because you’re invited, doesn’t mean you’re welcome.” The film is funny, scary, and has sparked conversations (and even a viral challenge) throughout the country.

Find out what we think …

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of Get Out click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcasts, Soundcloud, or Google Play.

Jeff Sessions’ confirmation hearing

In an article about U.S. Attorney General-nominee Jeff Sessions’ confirmation hearing, ATTN: cited comments by Jody Armour of the USC Gould School about the recognition of institutional racism in law enforcement. University of Southern California law professor Jody Armour told ATTN: in August that some people may not want to admit that institutional racism exists or come to terms…

Grose quoted in FiveThirtyEight on redistricting and the Supreme Court

ESPN’s “FiveThirtyEight” quoted Christian Grose of USC Dornsife on why representation at local, state, and federal  levels can do much for historically under-represented minorities. Partisan battles aside, political scientists say that in order for the government to pay attention to minority communities, those districts need representatives who are accountable to them. Christian Grose, an associate…

LA Freewaves’ Anne Bray on Media as an Exchange of Consciousness

Our guest on this episode of LA Hashtags Itself is media artist Anne Bray. Bray is executive director of Freewaves, the LA-based nonprofit arts organization that advocates for and exhibits new, uncensored, independent media. She tells us about her thirty-plus years using media art to initiate difficult and essential dialogue around pressing social issues. Civic engagement – connection – is essential to strong governance. Art & technology can confront, educate, and connect us. Is art essential to good governance? With impactful engagement in communities around policy issues, art can bring us to a more socially just world.

Letter to a Trump Supporter #7: Black Lives Matter

The man in the video alleges that blacks are more violent, so it’s reasonable for cops to use force on them more often. The funny thing is, he never actually shows any evidence that cops use force because the suspect is more violent.

But we know that’s not the case.

The Black History of Housing in America: How the Dream Was Deferred

During this Black History Month, and for many to come, we must never forget the dream—and fight for a new inheritance, one woven not of exclusion but instead of that universal human spirit that calls us each home. If you want to understand the black-white wealth gap, it helps to know the story of William…

Between the World and Me

We’re continuing our conversation about race in America, with the book Toni Morrison calls “required reading.” Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates is ostensibly a letter to his son about growing up a black male in America. This prize winning correspondent of The Atlantic tackles the very big questions of our time.

Featuring Jody Armour, Raphael Bostic, William Resh, and Danielle Williams.

The New Jim Crow

The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander is one of the most important American books in the last decade. Alexander systematically explores the policy changes from the days of Nixon through the present – exploring how each decision has created and allowed a system which criminalizes blackness, brownness, otherness in way that both creates new racial biases and confirms them by incarcerating millions of young black and brown men (and to a lesser extent, black and brown women).