City of Inmates

Historian Kelly Lytle Hernández brings us the absorbing history of how authorities in Los Angeles have used imprisonment as a tool to control both labor and migration. Our podcast features host Jeffery Jenkins with guests Robynn Cox, David Sloane, and Danielle Williams.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of City of Inmates click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

Stop Whining About the NFL Protests Already

Fortune published an op-ed by Jody Armour of the USC Gould School about the continuing NFL protests for social justice and against police brutality. Armour points out that public opinion was against civil disobedience and protesting leading up to the 1964 Civil Rights Act and current polling does not reflect the potential long-term impact of…

Sports and Racial Justice in America

To some, it represents the highest ideals of our society. To others, it is a symbol of unfulfilled potential at best, outright oppression at worst. Are we referring to the American flag? Or to American sports? This debate is about more than one athlete or one gesture. It is about an institution, a system of competition, dominance, and deeply ingrained beliefs. In this episode, we examine this balance of power—and the protestors who are trying to change it. In front of a live audience at the USC Gould School of Law, Prof. Jody David Armour interviews ESPN writer Jason Reid about Colin Kaepernick, political activism, and being black in America.

Special thanks to the USC Gould School of Law for sponsoring this event and allowing us to record as part of this ongoing series of conversations bringing you the smartest minds from the University of Southern California and beyond, wrestling with the defining challenges of our time.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play.

The Hotel Play

On April 29, 1992, Los Angeles erupted into chaos and violence after four white police officers were acquitted in the beating of African American Rodney King. The Hotel Play asks what, if anything, has changed in the past 25 years?

Join Jody David Armour, Paula Cizmar, Aubrey Hicks, and David Sloane as we think about race, Los Angeles, art, and social movements. We look at the moment that was the uprising in 1992 and how community organizing that grew out of that moment became a movement.

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of The Hotel Play, click the arrow in the Soundcloud player at the top of this post. Or download and subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, or Google Play.

Bonus- Cop in the Hood (part 2)

In part 2 of our discussion of Cop in the Hood by Peter Moskos, we discuss the notion of discretion in the legal system – by police all the way to prosecutors & parole/probation boards. We think about discrimination in enforcement made possible by discretion. We think about conflicts of interest in investigations of police misconduct – especially in relation to the war on drugs. How should we move forward?

The Ethics of Governing

PhD candidate Anthony Orlando discusses the “Ethics of Democracy” in the latest episode of Our American Discourse.

Democracy is a dialogue. It requires our leaders to ask, to listen, and to react. Good governance thus hinges on conversation and consent—and whether we like it or not, conflict. Planners and policymakers have to balance competing needs, never more so than in today’s polarized environment. How do they do the right thing? Does such a thing even exist? Citizenship demands that we engage with these uncomfortable questions, especially in this troubled era.

Listen to this episode of Our American Discourse by clicking on the orange play arrow on this post, or subscribe at iTunes, Soundcloud, Google Play, or anywhere you listen to podcasts.

LA Freewaves’ Anne Bray on Media as an Exchange of Consciousness

Our guest on this episode of LA Hashtags Itself is media artist Anne Bray. Bray is executive director of Freewaves, the LA-based nonprofit arts organization that advocates for and exhibits new, uncensored, independent media. She tells us about her thirty-plus years using media art to initiate difficult and essential dialogue around pressing social issues. Civic engagement – connection – is essential to strong governance. Art & technology can confront, educate, and connect us. Is art essential to good governance? With impactful engagement in communities around policy issues, art can bring us to a more socially just world.

Community Development Agreements – New Challenges for Urban Governance (Highlights)

Highlights from Jovanna Rosen’s presentation for the USC Bedrosian Center on Governance. Watch the full version here:https://youtu.be/v2fNLQDT6n8 On Thursday, April 7, 2016 Jovanna Rosen, PhD ’16, joined us to discuss her Bedrosian Center funded project. New forms of community development agreements called Community Benefits Agreements (CBAs) and Project Labor Agreements (PLAs) have recently emerged in…

Community Development Agreements – New Challenges for Urban Governance (Full Video)

On Thursday, April 7, 2016 Jovanna Rosen, PhD ’16, joined us to discuss her Bedrosian Center funded project. New forms of community development agreements called Community Benefits Agreements (CBAs) and Project Labor Agreements (PLAs) have recently emerged in urban governance. These community development agreements represent a new way to manage urban development that supports dialogue…

The New Jim Crow

The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander is one of the most important American books in the last decade. Alexander systematically explores the policy changes from the days of Nixon through the present – exploring how each decision has created and allowed a system which criminalizes blackness, brownness, otherness in way that both creates new racial biases and confirms them by incarcerating millions of young black and brown men (and to a lesser extent, black and brown women).