How Do the Rich Spend Their Money and Why Has It Changed?

Is conspicuous consumption a thing of the past? What are today’s wealthy spending their money on? In today’s episode of Our American Discourse, Elizabeth Currid-Halkett helps us walk a mile in the shoes of the spending habits of today’s “aspirational class.”

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

Is the cemetery dead? Sloane examines new trends in ‘planning for death’

Inspired by his forthcoming book Is the Cemetery Dead?, Sloane was the featured speaker for the March 12 USC Price Conversation in New York, addressing Price alumni and current students, as well as SEO Scholars from local high schools. He gave a poignant, personal talk that encompassed changing American attitudes about cremation to how to support friends who are grieving.

Location, Location, Location! Mobility and Opportunity in East King County

Emily Lieb brings us another research update from Seattle from the Access to Opportunity Project:

What’s in a neighborhood? Scholars (and realtors) agree: Where a person lives determines how much access to opportunity she has. Good schools, safe streets, high-quality housing that appreciates in value, accessible jobs and services, clean air and water—all of these things make it possible for people to do the best they can for themselves and their families. Poor schools, high crime rates, bad housing, an unhealthy environment, and relative inaccessibility do the opposite. Each one of these things is an obstacle standing between a family and its potential.

Marissa Gluck: “I would have given you a very different answer before November 2016”

Marissa Gluck is a digital research strategist who’s worked in tech since the mid-90s, an urbanism and architecture writer, and a principal of the design-cum-civic engagement non-profit Design East of La Brea, or de LaB. Through her unique bundle of expertise, Marissa gives us insights into how her three fields engage with issues of culture, identity, and civic participation. This long, fun conversation is about how Marissa is, above all, an conversationalist. Learn how she uses empathy and storytelling to make things accessible to her audience, whoever they are at the time.

Thanks again for listening and let us know what you think of the conversation on Twitter (Bedrosian, me), Facebook, or email.

To build better cities, men need to listen when women speak

Vicky Mochama mentions Lisa Schweitzer in an article for Toronto’s Metro News on building better cities by listening to more female voices. Mochama cites the recent article in Curbed by Alissa Walker tackling the issue of mansplaining in urbanist circles. What we lose in that is nuance. Walker cites Lisa Schweitzer, an urbanist and professor of…

How do we know what works?

Lisa K. Bates, Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Urban Studies in the Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning at Portland State University, updates us on research in the Access to Opportunity Project.

When thinking about assessing the impact of Humboldt Gardens’ GOALS program, which is the project‘s version of HUD‘s Family Self-Sufficiency Program (FSS), it is useful to know the program‘s context. The concept of FSS is straightforward — parents participate in programming designed to promote employment and financial stability, working with a case manager to set goals.

Confronting Male Dominance in the Urban Planning Debate

LA Streets Blog cited comments by Lisa Schweitzer of the USC Price School on how men dominate urban planning debates. Schweitzer has a few theories on why women are getting drowned out by Smartest Boy Urbanists. Women often want to engage in a conversation that centers around identity, which in an urban context means building cities that…