Potter on Political Violence in China

by Casey Fischl

Philip Potter discussed his research paper, “Political Violence in China: Terrorism, Official Media, and Political Priorities,” during the January 15, 2019 PIPE Workshop. His research focuses on terrorism and counterterrorism in China, to answer the question of why it is critical that the United States begins to pay more attention to the current state of affairs in China.

An unHappy Meal: how government spending forced reliance on fast food

by Olivia Olson

Those living in poverty are among the victims of a system that renders fast food and other such unhealthy products the only viable options for low-income citizens. From commodity crop subsidies, to federal programs that place fast food in the heart of urban areas, obesity is not “a moral lapse of a brain chemical but the effect of poverty.”

Political Scientists Gather to Examine the Interplay of Race & Law Enforcement

Political scientists have increasingly turned their attention to understanding the politics, consequences, and implications of race and law enforcement. Panelists at the recent PIPE Symposium on Race & Law Enforcement presented cutting edge work on police-community relations, the implications of police violence for democracy, and the gaps in political representation often faced by people of color.

Corn-Fed: Taking stalk of the government’s role in industrialized corn

by Olivia Olson

Not on a cob. Not served with peas. But in your soft drinks, condiments, fast food, and salad dressing. The term ‘corn-fed’ once harkened back to Midwestern children with rosy cheeks, but has taken on a whole new meaning with the pervasiveness of industrialized corn.

Why not Evidence-Based Medicine?

by Shuaifeng Yao Former President John F. Kennedy said: “Mothers all want their sons to grow up to be president, but they don’t want them to become politicians in the process.” I would add mothers also want their sons to be doctors. In terms of medical care, when your doctor stands in opposition to your political…

Unsavory pork & decentralization

by Pamela Clouser McCann

We ask the question: what are the conditions under which legislators would vote against fiscal transfers to their states?  We argue that members of Congress, who care about the ability to claim credit and show their constituents they are fighting for their interests, think carefully about their intergovernmental context and the fact that executive branch agencies disseminate federal dollars and implement federal programs.

How will the Michael Cohen and Duncan Hunter scandals affect the November election? Here’s what our research finds.

The Washington Post published commentary by Abby Wood of the USC Gould School and Christian Grose of the USC Dornsife College on whether elected officials who violate campaign finance laws will be punished at the polls. The authors turned to the post-Watergate era when campaign finance violations were often in the headlines. Violations at that time told voters that a candidate was, at worst, corrupt or, at best, a disorganized manager, the authors wrote.

Our current political climate has enough parallels to the Watergate era that we suspect voters will react negatively to campaign finance violations again. We will find out Nov. 6.