Aguila shares data on elderly pensions, effective implementation at OECD conference in Paris

Research from USC Price School of Public Policy Assistant Professor Emma Aguila indicates that monthly disbursements provide greater health benefits. She presented these findings in June at the International Network for Pensions, Aging and Retirement Research (INPARR) Conference on Pensions at the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) in Paris.

New paper: Corporate charitable foundations, executive entrenchment, and shareholder distributions

New paper published: “Corporate charitable foundations, executive entrenchment, and shareholder distributions.”

Professor Nicolas J. Duquette, along with co-author, has a new paper in the Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Scholars convene on methods and trends in subnational policy making research

“The study of state and local politics has taken off over the last decade. Data, methods, and research interests have evolved. There are a variety of important questions that can’t be examined well at the Federal level, because of severe case limitations.  But scholars can get leverage on these questions thanks to the sizable and interesting variation that exists at the state and local levels,” said Jeff Jenkins as he brought together scholars from across the nation to examine the study of subnational policy making.

Bedrosian Director presenting at the 2018 Congress & History Conference, Princeton

Jeffery Jenkins, Bedrosian Center Director, and co-author Thomas Gray will be presenting a paper at the 2018 Congress & History Conference at Prinecton University on June 7-8, 2018. The paper is titled “A Bridge Too Far?: Examining Bridging Assumptions in Common-Space Estimations.” It will be presented as part of a three paper panel on “Methodological…

New paper: Policy uncertainty and corporate performance in government-sponsored voluntary environmental programs

New paper published: “Policy uncertainty and corporate performance in government-sponsored voluntary environmental programs.”

Professor Shui-Yan Tang, along with co-authors, has a new paper in the Journal of Environmental Management.

First annual political institutions, economy conference highlights cross-disciplinary collaboration

With the goal of fostering cross-disciplinary synergies among political economy scholars and fill the need for a regular meeting place, the USC PIPE Collaborative hosted the First Annual Political Institutions and Political Economy Conference on March 15-16, convening major U.S. scholars from political science, economics, and law to cover important new research on topics such as the unilateral presidency, Congressional committees, city policies, electoral rules, political leadership, and partisanship.

New paper: Distributive politics and congressional voting: public lands reform in the Jacksonian era

New paper published: “Distributive politics and congressional voting: public lands reform in the Jacksonian era” by Sean Gailmard, Jeffery A. Jenkins

During the 1830s, Congress passed a series of laws reforming U.S. policy on acquiring public lands. These laws established a federal land policy of preemption, under which squatters on public land obtained legal title to it in exchange for payment of a minimum (and low) price per acre. Preemption significantly liberalized the terms of land ownership in the U.S. We analyze roll call voting on the preemption acts in Congress from a distributive politics perspective …

New Paper: Benefits-sharing agreements and nonideal theory: The warning signs of agreement co-optation

“Benefits-sharing agreements and nonideal theory: The warning signs of agreement co-optation”
Jovanna Rosen, Lisa Schweitzer

Community members seek benefits-sharing planning agreements to advance their own distributive justice goals by directing benefits to communities. Nonideal theory does much to explain the context and possibilities for these agreements. The agreements forged between communities and development interests seek to address, but not completely achieve, distributive justice via consensus …

New Paper: The Role of Clinics in Determining Older Recent Immigrants’ Use of Health Services

New publication from Emma Aguila: “The Role of Clinics in Determining Older Recent Immigrants’ Use of Health Services”

Older adults represent an increasing share of adults legally admitted to the U.S. [1]. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996 bars immigrants admitted as lawful permanent residents who have been in the U.S. < 5 years (hereafter referred to as recent immigrants) from receiving federally-funded Medicaid. States have the option of providing Medicaid benefits regardless of duration in the U.S. but few provide comprehensive coverage ...

New paper: Gender Difference and Intra-Household Economic Power in Mortgage Signing Order

New publication from Richard Green: “Gender Difference and Intra-Household Economic Power in Mortgage Signing Order.”

Gender difference is deeply rooted in our identity and has been widely documented by economists in disparate real-world economic contexts. For example, though women have made substantial labor market gains in both participation and earnings, gender inequality persists …