Bedrosian Director wins journal award for analysis of American West settlers

By Matthew Kredell

In the early history of the United States, settlers moved west into unsurveyed land and built homes and farms without regard to land title.

As the country expanded, one of the federal government’s chief means of acquiring revenue was the sale of public land. When the government put land up for auction, frontier settlers were at risk of losing their homes or farms.

White Identity and the Emergence of the Republican Party in the Early-20th Century South

by Casey Fischl

Jeffery A. Jenkins discussed his research paper, White Identity and the Emergence of the Republican Party in the Early-20th Century South, co-authored with Boris Heersink (Fordham University). The paper explores the relationship between white identity, the GOP, and the South

USC Price alumna Brettany Shannon follows her authentic path, including co-editing book on authenticity and community development

By Cristy Lytal

According to Brettany Shannon, media arts and digital communications are playing increasingly important roles in community development. And as the first Scholar-in-Residence at the Bedrosian Center at the USC Price School of Public Policy, she’s exploring this topic through a variety of media ranging from an edited book to an Instagram database to a podcast.

Researchers gather to discuss methods for causal arguments in the study of the history of American Politics

by Nathan K. Micatka and Nicholas Napolio 

While the field of political science may seem staid to outsiders, it has evolved significantly in terms of research methods over the last 40 years. The behaviorally based studies that dominated in the 1970s gave rise to the subfield of American Political Development (APD) in the 1980s as a way to more fully realize and incorporate the study of history and institutions. APD scholars made narrative-based causal arguments to understand the history of American politics. Over the past decade, a trend toward more data-oriented studies of causal relationships has emerged …

Return Migration and Decontamination after the 2011 Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accidents

“Return Migration and Decontamination after the 2011 Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accidents,” December 2018. Adam Rose, Jonathan Eyer and Shingo Nagamatsu Abstract: Return migration is a key to community recovery from many disasters. Japanese governments have conducted radiation decontamination efforts in the Exclusion Zone designated after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster in order to encourage return…

Toward a Theory of Population Repatriation from Disasters

“Toward a Theory of Population Repatriation from Disasters,” August 2018. Adam Rose, Jonathan Eyer and Shingo Nagamatsu

Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to present the outlines of a conceptual framework of the economics of population repatriation following disasters. It is acknowledged that economics is only one major dimension of the issue, but it is intended . . .

Political Scientists Gather to Examine the Interplay of Race & Law Enforcement

Political scientists have increasingly turned their attention to understanding the politics, consequences, and implications of race and law enforcement. Panelists at the recent PIPE Symposium on Race & Law Enforcement presented cutting edge work on police-community relations, the implications of police violence for democracy, and the gaps in political representation often faced by people of color.

Aguila shares data on elderly pensions, effective implementation at OECD conference in Paris

Research from USC Price School of Public Policy Assistant Professor Emma Aguila indicates that monthly disbursements provide greater health benefits. She presented these findings in June at the International Network for Pensions, Aging and Retirement Research (INPARR) Conference on Pensions at the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) in Paris.

New paper: Corporate charitable foundations, executive entrenchment, and shareholder distributions

New paper published: “Corporate charitable foundations, executive entrenchment, and shareholder distributions.”

Professor Nicolas J. Duquette, along with co-author, has a new paper in the Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.