Category: Bookclub Podcast

An audio bookclub. Our geeks read and discuss new and classic works in the policy field – fictional and non. Social justice, tech, politics, policy … we cover it all and more. We want to get at the heart of what it means to be a community member in America.

Listen on our site here, or subscribe at ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, Spotify, or your favorite podcasting app.

Get Involved: Join the conversation about each episode on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram. Or email us at bedrosian.bookclub@usc.edu.

January 25, 2016

What is the great tragedy in The Tragedy of Richard II? What makes a good leader – a king, a president? Can Shakespeare inform political discussions today? Listen and see what our guests think.

December 21, 2015

Alan Ehrenhalt argues that the demographics of the urban and suburban landscape are in the midst of a grand change in the book The Great Inversion. After the great sprawl of the 50s, the affluent are reclaiming urban spaces while minorities and immigrants are moving to the edges. New urbanism is winning and Ehrenhalt uses several examples to prove his point. Find out if our readers agreed with the thesis.

December 15, 2015

Part memoir, part history, Treuer writes about reservations within the boundaries of the United States. This book should be an essential read for all Americans. Find out why Treuer decided to write the book, some challenges he faced along the way, and what might be coming next.

November 25, 2015

In Rez Life David Treuer spirals in and out of personal story, interviews, and historical narrative to paint a full picture of life as an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation. An important book about the power of individual and collective action, the power of place, and how history lives on in our (collective) lives today.

October 26, 2015

What I Saw at the Revolution is a political memoir for those who don’t usually read political memoirs, a testimony to the power of language in politics. Noonan was a speechwriter for President Reagan, in both of his terms. Join us for a conversation on the power of language in politics and for a look at how our Federal government works.

September 29, 2015

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates is ostensibly a letter to his son about growing up a black male in America. This prize winning correspondent of The Atlantic tackles the very big questions of our time.

September 2, 2015

Walter Mosley, most known for his LA crime fiction, tackles aging and agency in this beautiful novel, The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey.

July 29, 2015

The US has used the War on drugs to create a racial caste system: a successor to the Jim Crow days we thought we left behind. The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander is one of the most important American books in the last decade. Alexander systematically explores the policy changes from the days of Nixon through the present – exploring how each decision has created and allowed a system which criminalizes blackness, brownness, otherness in way that both creates new racial biases and confirms them by incarcerating millions of young black and brown men (and to a lesser extent, black and brown women).

July 2, 2015

Written in 1968, Do Androids Dream of ElectricSheep is set in a near-future San Francisco amid vast desertion to off-world colonies. Those remaining on Earth contend with nuclear fallout dust and other dangers. Dick asks fundamental questions in the novel and our discussion touches on just a few of these.

June 1, 2015

On Such a Full Sea follows Fan, a young woman from one of the labor communities, as she leaves her home in search of her love. In a corporatized future world – where the wealthy fly in helicopters, workers try to compete with robots, and the really poor live in favelas – what becomes of social mobility and the notions of resilience and hope and equality?

April 29, 2015

In this edition of the Bedrosian Book Club Podcast, we’re looking at a book on gentrification called A Neighborhood That Never Changes, by Japonica Brown-Saracino.

March 28, 2015

In this edition of the Bedrosian Book Club Podcast, we’re looking at the classic nonfiction book, 
Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, the book that launched the environmental movement. 

March 3, 2015

In this edition of the Bedrosian Book Club Podcast, Center Director Raphael Bostic interviews Daria Roithmayr, the author of the new book Reproducing Racism: How Everyday Choices Lock In White Advantage.

February 19, 2015

Giving new language to the ongoing dialogue of racial inequality in America, Reproducing Racism distills research from different fields into a highly readable argument that historical actions matter more than current prejudices in locking in inequality.