The Holt Lecture: Empowering Women in the Workplace with Gretchen Carlson

The 2018 Holt Lecture featured a conversation with Gretchen Carlson, formerly of Fox News, and Professor Lisa Schweitzer. Carlson helped change the cultural conversation around sexual harassment in the workplace when she filed and won a lawsuit against the then-chairman of Fox News, Roger Ailes, for sexual harassment. Since that time, she has “walked off the set” and began…

PIPE* Workshop: Janna Rezaee, USC

Janna Rezaee, Assistant Professor, USC Sol Price School of Public Policy, received her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley. “Revolving Doors” co-authored by Ryan Hubert, UC Berkeley Janna Rezaee’s research focuses on the “revolving door” between government and the private sector as an institutional response to policy-development monopolies. The prevailing wisdom about the revolving door is that…

Lunch with a Leader: Joanelle Romero

As an actress, singer, songwriter, entrepreneur, producer and filmmaker of American Indian performing arts including programming on her Red Nation Media Network Channel, Joanelle Romero has entertained, inspired, moderated, enlightened the general public for nearly 30 years. Using media as a primary tool, Romero has created a connection within Indian Country including the film, television and music industries…

PIPE* Workshop: Sarah Anderson, UCSB

Legislative solutions to society’s pressing problems usually require compromise, but we find that around a quarter of state legislators and many elected city officials reject proposals that move policy in their preferred direction and make them better off. The legislators who reject compromise proposals tend to be those who perceive that their voters – especially their primary voters – are likely to punish them for compromising. This threat of punishment also affects the voting behavior of members of Congress.

Parties & Partisanship in the Age of Trump Symposium

Partisan polarization has steadily increased in recent years. Democrats and Republicans in Congress have become two ideologically divided groups, with little ability to work together to solve the nation’s problems. And, citizens have increasingly used partisanship to guide their voting decisions, even as they diverge more and more on answers to the important questions of the day.

As we moved into the second year of Trump’s administration, we explored what partisanship looks like in Congress and the nation.

Governance Salon: Sarah Binder & Mark Spindel

The Myth of Independence: How Congress Governs the Federal Reserve Sarah Binder is professor of political science at George Washington University and senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. Her books include Advice and Dissent and Stalemate. Mark Spindel has spent his entire career in investment managemetn at such organizations as Salomon Brothers, the World Bank,…

The Feres Doctrine, Service Members, & the Courts

Dwight Stirling is CEO and Co-Founder of the Veterans Legal Institute® (VLI), having general executive oversight over the Legal Services Division and Think Tank. Laura Riley is a practicing public interest attorney and has published many legal articles, including three in Los Angeles Lawyer. Under the Feres doctrine, a policy stemming from a 1950 Supreme Court…

PIPE* Workshop: R. Michael Alvarez, Caltech

The first goal of the PIPE program will be to hold a regular scholarly workshop, structured around external speakers, that will bring together USC faculty and graduate students from Price, Gould, Marshall, Dornsife (the Political Science and Economics Departments) who have an interest in political institutions and political economy. The workshop will provide a regular forum for PIPE scholarship and create an environment for new collaborations…

Dean Jack Knott in Conversation with Raphael Bostic

Jack Knott, the Dean and the C. Erwin and Ione L. Piper Chair and Professor of the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy had a conversation with USC Professor and President and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, Raphael Bostic.