A $1,800 apartment became a $3,300 corporate rental. Is that bad for housing?

Los Angeles Times quoted Richard Green of the USC Price School on if extended-stay apartments are hurting the housing market overall. But Green argued the correct policy response isn’t to crack down on the practice, but to allow more housing to be built in the first place. That way, different living arrangements can flourish without sending prices higher.

“People sometimes need a place to live for six months too,” he said. “They are not any less of human beings than people who need to live [somewhere] for a long time.”