Awards to improve health

Sloane and Lewis awarded grants to bring services to high-need communities

LaVonna Lewis

Community Transformation Grant

The Community Health Councils proposes to implement proven programmatic, policy, environmental, and infrastructure improvements in a series of racially/ethnically diverse and concentrated high-need communities within the City of Los Angeles in order to transform neighborhoods and support the successful improvement of optimal health outcomes among low-income, vulnerable families, and residents. The project plans to promote tobacco-free living, healthy eating and active living, high-impact quality clinical and other preventative services, and healthy and safe physical environment.

Total funding on this grant is $7,883,885 and will affect approximately 479,000 residents living in Los Angeles, focusing on low-income, racial/ethnic minority communities

LaVonna Lewis and David Sloane

REACH Obesity and Hypertension Demonstration Project

The REACH Demonstration grant is a cooperative agreement between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Community Health Councils (CHC), one of LA’s leading health care and public health community groups focusing on policy and planning changes. Professors Lewis and Sloane serve as evaluators on the cooperative agreement. The goal of the grant is to create a community-based model for improving health in underserved, heavily minority communities. The grant will have activities at several scales, starting with the neighborhood school and rising up to the City of Los Angeles’ Community Planning Areas.

The hope is to create an interwoven set of activities that improve adolescent and adult health outcomes through the development of school-based wellness centers, by improving the nutritional and physical activity resources available to community residents living in neighborhoods around the schools, and through the institutionalization of health improvement strategies into the community plans. The CHC has partnered with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health and the Los Angeles Unified School District to develop and implement these interventions. USC, as represented by Lewis and Sloane, will serve as the evaluators of the project, working with a group of subject-matter experts at the CDC and with the community groups to develop a way to measure the successes of the interventions and help CHC and CDC develop a model that other cities might benefit from.

USC will receive $1.539 million over the three years of the grant
Total funding on this grant is $7,693,912 and will affect approximately 449,000 African-American and Hispanic/Latino residents in the West Adams Baldwin Hills and South Los Angeles areas.