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Watchmen (HBO Series)



Host Erroll Southers is joined by Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro, Alex Ago, and Aubrey Hicks to discuss the first episode of the new HBO series Watchmen.

Starring Regina King, Tim Blake Nelson, and an enormously talented ensemble cast, the series picks up beyond the first film and original DC comic series written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Dave Gibbons. We are in an alternate version of the world, one in which the war in Vietnam was won and Vietnam annexed as a state. A world in which reparations of some sort were paid. A world in which the police wear masks and the great masked vigilantes of the past are now legends of a different kind.

We discuss the ability of pop culture to delved into deep societal issues, and what the responsibility of the creators is to historical content in a fictional setting.

Twitter: @BedrosianCenter @AubreyHi, @AngeMarieH, @esouthersHVE
Email: reel.review@usc.edu

Week in Politics: Mexican Tariff Shutdown, 2020 Presidential Candidate Check Ins and More

KPCC-FM’s “AirTalk” interviewed Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro of the USC Dornslife School as part of their weekly political roundtable. Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee Jerrold Nadler announced that he’s reached an agreement with the DOJ, ahead of the contempt vote (Airtalk) President Trump’s Mexico tariff deadline is today. Even though Trump announced that Read more…

The Death of Truth

Listen to Bedrosian Bookclub with Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro, Jeffery Jenkins, David Sloane, and Aubrey Hicks with the audio player below. This month, Aubrey, Ange-Marie, Jeff, and David discuss the new book from renowned literary critic Michiko Kakutani, The Death of Truth : Notes on Falsehood in the Age of Trump. Read more…

A Star is Born

The latest remake of A Star is Bornis, well it’s getting mixed reviews. Some are rapturous (like this, this, or thisand espeically this) others not so much (for instance: this, this, or this). Our panel discuss this latest version in the “there is always a possibility of getting discovered” American Read more…

Colette

Does the biopic about a 19th century French writer Colette bring her to life? This episode features a conversation on a film which seems to be of the moment. Gender dynamics, intellectual property, relationships … history. Host Jonathan Schwartz is joined by podcast favorites Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro, Anita Dashiell-Sparks, and Alex Ago. @BedrosianCenter, @AubreyHi, @AngeMarieH, @esouthersHVE, @jonHLYP, @USCPrice, @AlessandroAgo To listen Read more…

Sorry to Bother You

Sorry to Bother You, written and directed by Boots Riley. The film follows a young Cassius (Cash) Green who joins an Oakland telemarketing company, adopting a white accent to thrive, propelling him up the ladder. He is faced with the dilemma of success and the ethics of what he’s selling. Read more…

Tully (dir. Jason Reitman)

We’re serious. This podcast has spoilers!

Go see Tully, then listen to our conversation on motherhood, nostalgia, and film-making, featuring host Erroll Southers and guests Alex Ago, Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro, and Lt. Col. Olivia Nelson.

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of The Post click the arrow in the player at the top of this post. Or download and subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, or Google Play.

Kindred

“I lost an arm on my last trip home.

My left arm.”

The iconic first line of Octavia Butler’s novel, Kindred, puts the reader right there. The gravity of the legacy of slavery is there in the face. Who has lost an arm? How? Why?

Listen as host Jeffery Jenkins and guests Ange-Marie Alfaro, Caroline Bhalla, and Aubrey Hicks as they think about this classic work of American fiction.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of the “Kindred” episode click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcasts, Soundcloud, Google Play, Stitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

The Post

Chronicling The Washington Post’s publishing of the Pentagon Papers during the tail end of the Vietnam War and starring Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep – does The Post accurately portray this important time in American History where the very nature of the First Amendment and National Security seemed in direct contrast?

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of The Post click the arrow in the player at the top of this post. Or download and subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, or Google Play.

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