How Do the Rich Spend Their Money and Why Has It Changed?

Is conspicuous consumption a thing of the past? What are today’s wealthy spending their money on? In today’s episode of Our American Discourse, Elizabeth Currid-Halkett helps us walk a mile in the shoes of the spending habits of today’s “aspirational class.”

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

Hillbilly Elegy

Hillbilly Elegy is a memoir by J. D. Vance about family; about Appalachia, hillbillies, and the American white underclass in the rural and semi-rural interior of the United States. Vance relates his traumatic, poverty stricken upbringing to the larger social problems in both his hometown and the larger population. Through his personal struggles, he raises questions of personal responsibility and role of government in communities.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of Hillbilly Elegy click the orange arrow in the Soundcloud player here, or download and subscribe through iTunes, Soundcloud, or Google Play.

Fences

Our inaugural episode of the Price Projection Room podcast features a lively discussion of the film adaptation of August Wilson’s Fences, directed by Denzel Washington. Our guests include Gregg T. Daniel, Ange-Marie Hancock, and Jonathan Schwartz with moderator Erroll Southers.

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of Fences use the player here, or download it and subscribe through iTunes, Soundcloud, or Google Play

White Trash

In White Trash: The 400-year Untold History of Class in America, historian Nancy Isenberg traces white poverty and class from the earliest British settlements through to the 21st century. What she finds is that the mythology of social mobility and classlessness of American Exceptionalism is just that, a myth. By taking a deep dive into a sub-class of Americans, Isenberg hopes that Americans can face a truth about the enduring poverty on inequality that has shaped the American consciousness. That not only do we have classes, but these classes have been built by policies going back to the very reason British citizens came to the colonies. Our discussion of the book looks at where this history contributes to our current political conversation and where it could have been more focused to tell the story in a more cohesive way.

Featuring Aubrey Hicks, Anthony Orlando, Lisa Schweitzer, and John Sonego