Learning about sustainable water management: The case of Los Angeles

Running water in our homes is sort of magical when you think about it. It’s one of the most important technological improvements of industrialized societies, which has, without a doubt, had a major impact on our quality of life … it is hard to keep water policy in the public discourse and in the forefront of policy when we don’t really educate ourselves about how basic water management works.

On Flint, water, and environmental justice

by Patricia Quintero Estades If you’re like me, you don’t worry about how you’ll get your next glass of water to drink or your next shower. In most developed nations, clean and safe water is something we often take for granted. When we think of conserving water we most often worry about reducing our utility bills…

The Flint Lead Poisoning Disaster: Why We Must Invest in Healthy Homes

by Raphael Bostic About 150 years ago, people figured out that lead pipes could kill them. In 1861, fifty prisoners in King County Jail in Brooklyn started vomiting uncontrollably, until a doctor realized that the water supply was contaminated with lead. Seven years later, a New York City woman named Elizabeth Galler was accused of poisoning…

Paula Daniels: Championing environmental sustainability

by Justine Dodgen Paula Daniels has long been an advocate for environmental causes. Raised in Hawaii, Daniels has said she’s cared about water from a young age, and remembers learning about the importance of malama aina – stewardship of the land- from her grandfather. In a LA Weekly interview in 2012, Daniels says she even asked…

Tang publishes new article in Policy Studies Journal

by Justine Dodgen This month, Professor and Bedrosian Center Research Director Shui Yan Tang coauthored a new article in the Policy Studies Journal entitled “Political Commitment, Policy Ambiguity, and Corporate Environmental Practices.” His paper examines how regulatory factors are related to basic and proactive corporate environmental management practices in the Pearl River Delta region in China. His research found…

Silent Spring

Featuring Raphael Bostic, Lisa Collins, Richard Green, and Dan Mazmanian In this edition of the Bedrosian Book Club Podcast, we’re looking at the classic nonfiction book,  Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, the book that launched the environmental movement. Edward O. Wilson said of the book, “We are still poisoning the air and water and eroding the biosphere, albeit…

Planning the Future of CEQA and Dense Development

by Jeremy Loudenback December 10, 2014 As California ponders the shape of its future, nothing underscores the current challenges of urban development more than the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). Since its passage in 1970, CEQA has remained at the heart of many battles over development, with local governments, environmentalists, developers, and community groups all staked…

In Search of Denser Developments, California Ponders How to Manage New CEQA Guidelines

by Jeremy Loudenback November 13, 2014 by Jeremy Loudenback California is finding that the path toward creating more compact, transit-oriented developments is not always a smooth ride. Over the past couple of years, California has inaugurated new policies many hope will incentivize developers to build more in denser urban areas and lead to developments that prioritize…