Abby K. Wood

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks with a Bedrosian Faculty Affiliate, Abby K. Wood. Wood is Associate Professor of Law, Political Science and Public Policy. When she first started her career she noticed that program evaluation wasn’t as robust as it could be, so she wanted to learn causal inference in order to find that balance.

Her interest is in corruption and therefore transparency. Her current work is on campaign finance, transparency, and dark money.

 

Email: bedrosian.center@usc.edu
Twitter: @BedrosianCenter

Philip Potter

In this episode, Jeff Jenkins’s guest is Philip Potter, Associate Professor of Politics (UVA), and the Founding Director of the National Security Policy Center. Potter’s work looks at how public opinion effects foreign policy, when do policymakers have leeway, and when does public opinion constrain policy?

White Identity and the Emergence of the Republican Party in the Early-20th Century South

by Casey Fischl

Jeffery A. Jenkins discussed his research paper, White Identity and the Emergence of the Republican Party in the Early-20th Century South, co-authored with Boris Heersink (Fordham University). The paper explores the relationship between white identity, the GOP, and the South

Researchers gather to discuss methods for causal arguments in the study of the history of American Politics

by Nathan K. Micatka and Nicholas Napolio 

While the field of political science may seem staid to outsiders, it has evolved significantly in terms of research methods over the last 40 years. The behaviorally based studies that dominated in the 1970s gave rise to the subfield of American Political Development (APD) in the 1980s as a way to more fully realize and incorporate the study of history and institutions. APD scholars made narrative-based causal arguments to understand the history of American politics. Over the past decade, a trend toward more data-oriented studies of causal relationships has emerged …

LaGina Gause

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and LaGina Gause, Assistant Professor of Political Science at UC San Diego, discuss the pro-democracy (small d) results of her study on legislative responsiveness to collective action by marginalized groups.

Kindred

“I lost an arm on my last trip home.

My left arm.”

The iconic first line of Octavia Butler’s novel, Kindred, puts the reader right there. The gravity of the legacy of slavery is there in the face. Who has lost an arm? How? Why?

Listen as host Jeffery Jenkins and guests Ange-Marie Alfaro, Caroline Bhalla, and Aubrey Hicks as they think about this classic work of American fiction.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of the “Kindred” episode click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

Will Trump’s tariffs help him with his voters?

The Washington Post published commentary by Jeffery A. Jenkins of the USC Price School on if Trump’s tariffs will help him with his voters. Trump’s tariffs exhibit definite hallmarks of presidential particularism. At the same time, the tariffs were rolled out well in advance of the next presidential cycle — contrary to our expectations. More…

City of Inmates

Historian Kelly Lytle Hernández brings us the absorbing history of how authorities in Los Angeles have used imprisonment as a tool to control both labor and migration. Our podcast features host Jeffery Jenkins with guests Robynn Cox, David Sloane, and Danielle Williams.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of City of Inmates click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!