Tag: Jeffery A. Jenkins

January 22, 2020
December 9, 2019
October 30, 2019

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks with Seth Hill, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science UCSD. Hill studies how citizens motivate politician behavior.

They discuss representation, elections, and some extras just for you!

Email: bedrosian.center@usc.edu
Twitter: @BedrosianCenter

October 16, 2019


In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks with Leah Stokes. Stokes, a public scholar, is also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and affiliated with the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management and the Environmental Studies Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB).

They discuss the building of community on social media, being a public scholar, how politics is the barrier real work on climate change, her upcoming book, and many other things.

What a time to study political science and the climate?!

Email: bedrosian.center@usc.edu
Twitter: @BedrosianCenter

September 4, 2019

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks with a Bedrosian Faculty Affiliate, Abby K. Wood. Wood is Associate Professor of Law, Political Science and Public Policy. When she first started her career she noticed that program evaluation wasn’t as robust as it could be, so she wanted to learn causal inference in order to find that balance.

Her interest is in corruption and therefore transparency. Her current work is on campaign finance, transparency, and dark money.

Email: bedrosian.center@usc.edu
Twitter: @BedrosianCenter

July 18, 2019

If models of the world are all wrong, why are they critical to understanding our complex world? Page’s book entreats readers to push to me clear about how they think about the world.

Today, host Pamela Clouser McCann discusses the book The Model Thinker with guests Jeffery A. Jenkins and James Lo.

Join the conversation about each episode on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram. Or email us at bedrosian.bookclub@usc.edu.

May 8, 2019

Jeff Jenkins talks with Pamela Ban, UC San Diego about her recent research. First, she looks at how policy outcomes might change as Congress has a bit more gender representations. Then they discuss the revolving door and lobbying – how the cool off period has affected the lobbying industry. Finally, she thinks about how to use empirical data from newspapers to think about political power.

March 18, 2019

By Matthew Kredell

In the early history of the United States, settlers moved west into unsurveyed land and built homes and farms without regard to land title.

As the country expanded, one of the federal government’s chief means of acquiring revenue was the sale of public land. When the government put land up for auction, frontier settlers were at risk of losing their homes or farms.

February 13, 2019

In this episode, Jeff Jenkins’s guest is Philip Potter, Associate Professor of Politics (UVA), and the Founding Director of the National Security Policy Center. Potter’s work looks at how public opinion effects foreign policy, when do policymakers have leeway, and when does public opinion constrain policy?

January 30, 2019

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and political Boris Heersink, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Fordham University, look at the national party committees. What kind of power do the national committees have? What is the role of the committees, outside of the conventions? What role does the President play?

October 10, 2018

Political influence of public protest In this episode of the PS You’re Interestingpodcast, Jeff Jenkins and LaGina Gause, Assistant Professor of Political Science at UC San Diego, discuss the pro-democracy (small d)…

September 26, 2018

Creativity, Energy, & Experimentation In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and Benjamin Newman, Associate Professor of Public Policy and Political Science at the UC Riverside, discuss creativity…

July 10, 2018
May 29, 2018

Congressional historian Sarah Binder joins neighbor and investment manager, Matt Spindel in a look at the history of the relationship between the Federal Reserve and its legislative parent, Congress. The result is the Princeton University Press book The Myth of Independence: How Congress Governs the Federal Reserve.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of The Myth of Independence, click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcasts, Soundcloud, Google Play, Stitcher or your favorite podcasting app!