On Such a Full Sea

In this edition of the Bedrosian Book Club Podcast, we’re looking at the dystopian novel On Such a Full Sea by Chang-rae Lee. Lee’s novel follows Fan, a young woman from one of the labor communities, as she leaves her home in search of her love. In a corporatized future world – where the wealthy fly in helicopters, workers try to compete with robots, and the really poor live in favelas – what becomes of social mobility and the notions of resilience and hope and equality?

Building the Future of the Los Angeles River

by Jeremy Loudenback The Los Angeles River presents an intoxicating vision of change for Los Angeles A much-anticipated plan for the river would do more than just remove the concrete channel that for a long time erased the waterway from public memory. The 2007 Los Angeles River Revitalization Plan imagines connecting a newly verdant river…

Five Minutes with Pasadena Mayor Bill Bogaard

by Jeremy Loudenback In February, when Pasadena Mayor Bill Bogaard visited campus as part of Bedrosian Center’s Lunch with a Leader series, we had a chance to ask him a few questions about his long tenure at the helm of Pasadena. But change is coming for the city. Next Tuesday, Pasadena voters will elect a new…

Courting Justice in California

by Jeremy Loudenback Aside from robust voter turnout in last week’s city election, the most positive result of protests in Ferguson over policing practices may be attention to inequities in other parts of its criminal-justice system. Accounts by the Washington Post and last month’s Department of Justice report about Ferguson have called attention to the ways that…

The Top 5 Governance Songs

by Jeremy Loudenback This week, thousands of music fans, critics, and assorted cool hunters will assemble in the parched desert expanses of Indio, California, for the annual Coachella Arts and Music Festival. Featuring acts like Flying Lotus, Lil B, and Tame Impala, Coachella’s lineup is considered a cheat sheet to some of the country’s most buzz-worthy…

On the Banks of Change: Implementing a Plan for the Los Angeles River

by Jeremy Loudenback Last year, when the Army Corps of Engineers signed off on a $1.08 billion plan to revitalize an 11-mile stretch of the Los Angeles River, momentum for the project turned from a trickle into a swift current of expectations. Though a modest “back to basics” message has been a consistent theme of his…

Building Bridges with Bill Bogaard

by Jeremy Loudenback Despite his soft-spoken public persona, Pasadena Mayor Bill Bogaard casts a long shadow. Over the course of his 16-year tenure, most current Pasadena schoolchildren have grown up knowing only Bogaard as their mayor. During that span, Pasadena has undergone dramatic change, shifting from a sleepy town known for its time-honored traditions to a…

Worst in Governance: John Boehner

by Jeremy Loudenback January 2015 Worst in Governance That the United States is increasingly riven by strong partisan divisions is not exactly news in 2015. But the recent controversy around House Speaker John Boehner’s invitation to Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu to address a joint session of Congress establishes sets a dangerous precedent of disrupting the…

Best in Governance: Rules of Engagement

by Jeremy Loudenback January 2015 Best in Governance “Politics stops at the water’s edge” was the latter-day foreign-policy vision of Arthur Vandenberg, a one-time isolationist Republican senator from Michigan who fiercely opposed Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal policies. However, in the wake of World War II, Vandenberg’s work with President Harry S. Truman personified a robust…

Managing a Giant

January 20, 2015 by Jeremy Loudenback For William T. Fujioka, a distinguished 40-year career in public service began in humble circumstances. In 1972, Fujioka started working in the public sector as a custodian for Santa Cruz County. But after rising through the ranks in jobs for both the City of Los Angeles and Los Angeles…