The Line Becomes a River

Today’s book: The Line Becomes a River by Francisco Cantú.

The southern border between Mexico and the U.S. can be a violent place. Yet isn’t as easily defined as it seems.There are places where the border is permeable, invisible. The border is a construct, and the racialized rhetoric of The Border combined with two decades of militarization have wreaked havoc on the people and the land.

Toward a Theory of Population Repatriation from Disasters

“Toward a Theory of Population Repatriation from Disasters,” August 2018. Adam Rose, Jonathan Eyer and Shingo Nagamatsu

Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to present the outlines of a conceptual framework of the economics of population repatriation following disasters. It is acknowledged that economics is only one major dimension of the issue, but it is intended . . .

New Paper: The Role of Clinics in Determining Older Recent Immigrants’ Use of Health Services

New publication from Emma Aguila: “The Role of Clinics in Determining Older Recent Immigrants’ Use of Health Services”

Older adults represent an increasing share of adults legally admitted to the U.S. [1]. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996 bars immigrants admitted as lawful permanent residents who have been in the U.S. < 5 years (hereafter referred to as recent immigrants) from receiving federally-funded Medicaid. States have the option of providing Medicaid benefits regardless of duration in the U.S. but few provide comprehensive coverage ...

City of Inmates

Historian Kelly Lytle Hernández brings us the absorbing history of how authorities in Los Angeles have used imprisonment as a tool to control both labor and migration. Our podcast features host Jeffery Jenkins with guests Robynn Cox, David Sloane, and Danielle Williams.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of City of Inmates click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

Is Solidifying Borders the Answer to the Migrant Crisis in Europe?

2nd year MPP candidate, Robyn Burleson, tackles the growing refugee crisis in this overview piece.

The European Union is struggling to mitigate Europe’s refugee crisis as migrants flee civil wars and poverty in Syria, Iraq, and other nations caught up in domestic upheavals. Approximately 60 million people have been displaced because of conflicts around the world, the largest number of displaced people since World War 2. More than one million migrants traveled to Europe in 2015 alone, and Syria is the largest source of those refugees. The numbers of refugees continue to climb as civil wars escalate, and the majority of the migrants are arriving in Greece, Italy, and Turkey.

Migrant Entrepreneurs: The In-Between Advantage

Immigrants exist between two words: their country of origin and their new home. In this nexus lies unique challenges—and opportunities. The immigrant communities who maintain bonds with their origin, or “diasporas,” can bring what they have learned back with them. They can transform developing nations and spur economic growth with their entrepreneurship. They can bridge the divide between the prosperous and the poor—and inspire lasting change.

In this episode, we explore these transformative individuals with Jennifer Brinkerhoff.

Listen to this episode by clicking on the orange play arrow to the right here, or subscribe at iTunes, Soundcloud, or Google Play.