Consume with care: the social and environmental implications of the US avocado craze

by Olivia Olson

Whether blended into smoothies, drizzled with balsamic vinegar, or mashed into guacamole, one feature remains constant: America’s love for avocados. With an extensive array of health benefits, an increase in Latino population, and a delicious buttery flavor―not to mention their social media trendiness―our avocado consumption has unsurprisingly skyrocketed in recent years …

A spoonful less sugar helps the obesity rates go down

by Olivia Olson

While consumers frequently vilify fat, salt, or red meat, most fail to acknowledge sugar’s role in obesity and overweight. In the past 60 years of increased health consciousness, sugar has managed to largely avoid blame, and indeed increase its presence in a wide variety of ‘fat free,’ ‘gluten free,’ or ‘all natural’ ‘health foods.’

Snap Peas and Socioeconomic Inequality: the role of farmers’ markets in addressing food insecurity

by Olivia Olson

40 million Americans live in a state of perpetual uncertainty. Food insecurity, the condition that plagues these 40 million, leaves them without consistent access to healthy food or the resources to feed themselves and their families. This hardship manifests itself differently across income brackets and geographical locationsforcing families to skip meals, eat less and with less frequency, depend on unhealthy food options, or struggle to find their next meal.

An unHappy Meal: how government spending forced reliance on fast food

by Olivia Olson

Those living in poverty are among the victims of a system that renders fast food and other such unhealthy products the only viable options for low-income citizens. From commodity crop subsidies, to federal programs that place fast food in the heart of urban areas, obesity is not “a moral lapse of a brain chemical but the effect of poverty.”

Corn-Fed: Taking stalk of the government’s role in industrialized corn

by Olivia Olson

Not on a cob. Not served with peas. But in your soft drinks, condiments, fast food, and salad dressing. The term ‘corn-fed’ once harkened back to Midwestern children with rosy cheeks, but has taken on a whole new meaning with the pervasiveness of industrialized corn.