Tag: racism

September 10, 2020

Spectrum News 1 featured Jody Armour of the USC Gould School on his new book and the history of racist language deployed against Black people. “What makes so many people…

June 11, 2020
June 6, 2020
June 4, 2020

NBC News Los Angeles affiliate KNBC-TV will feature a virtual town hall on rooting out racism that will include Jody Armour of the USC Gould School, Najuma Smith-Pollard of the…

May 26, 2020
April 23, 2020
April 8, 2020
January 16, 2020
April 26, 2019

Host Aubrey Hicks is joined by professors Chris Redfearn and Liz Falletta in a discussion of the New York Times bestselling book White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo.

On today’s podcast, we talk about how white fragility works to sustain and reproduce the racist institutions & socialization which we all inherited.

Listen here, or subscribe at ApplePodcasts, Soundcloud, Spotify, or your favorite podcasting app.

Join the conversation about each episode on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram. Or email us at bedrosian.bookclub@usc.edu.

September 11, 2018
July 13, 2018
May 1, 2018

“I lost an arm on my last trip home.

My left arm.”

The iconic first line of Octavia Butler’s novel, Kindred, puts the reader right there. The gravity of the legacy of slavery is there in the face. Who has lost an arm? How? Why?

Listen as host Jeffery Jenkins and guests Ange-Marie Alfaro, Caroline Bhalla, and Aubrey Hicks as they think about this classic work of American fiction.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of the “Kindred” episode click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcasts, Soundcloud, Google Play, Stitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

April 4, 2018

Speaking to cadets at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado, USC Price School of Public Policy Professor Erroll Southers let them know that, even though they are intelligent students demonstrating a commitment to being the next generation of American leaders, they are also prime targets for recruitment by homegrown violent extremist organizations.

December 18, 2017

Strong female characters ground Mudbound as it tells of the challenges returning soldiers with different world views as they return to family and a small Mississippi community that hasn’t weathered the storms and triumphs they have seen half a world away. A spoilery conversation on this ensemble film about war at home and abroad.

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of Mudboundclick the arrow in the player on this post. Or download and subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, or Google Play.

March 10, 2017

Get Out follows a young African-American photographer on a visit to his white girlfriend’s parents’ home. The tag line sums up the deep horror of the film, “Just because you’re invited, doesn’t mean you’re welcome.” The film is funny, scary, and has sparked conversations (and even a viral challenge) throughout the country.

Find out what we think …

To listen to the Price Projection Room discussion of Get Out click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcasts, Soundcloud, or Google Play.

July 25, 2016

This month’s book is both poetry and criticism, Citizen: An American Lyric. Rankine’s piece is a revolution. A political, a poetic, complex revolution in 169 pages. We look at it through an unusual lens – what should we take away from works of art as we think about governance in America?

February 24, 2016

Join the USC Bedrosian Center and the USC School of Social Work Office of Global and Community Initiatives for a viewing of Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992. This work of documentary theatre weaves a portrait of real individuals who…

February 22, 2016
March 3, 2015

In this edition of the Bedrosian Book Club Podcast, Center Director Raphael Bostic interviews Daria Roithmayr, the author of the new book Reproducing Racism: How Everyday Choices Lock In White Advantage.

February 19, 2015

Giving new language to the ongoing dialogue of racial inequality in America, Reproducing Racism distills research from different fields into a highly readable argument that historical actions matter more than current prejudices in locking in inequality.

May 6, 2014

by Jeremy Loudenback Best in Governance Adam Silver Last week National Basketball Association (NBA) Commissioner Adam Silver came out with a decisive decision in response to odious remarks from Los…