Atlanta Fed CEO Bostic addresses economic policy, inequality at Price talk

By Matthew Kredell

USC Price School of Public Policy Professor Raphael Bostic returned to campus for the first time since taking leave to assume the role of president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, joining Dean Jack H. Knott for a discussion on the state and direction of the U.S. economy, issues of opportunity and inequality, and good governance.

Knott began the Feb. 5 conversation by asking Bostic – the first African-American to serve as president of a Fed regional bank – to explain what the Fed does. In response, Bostic admitted that perhaps few people understand.

The Risky, Rocky Ride of Today’s Economy . . . and the Central Bankers Who Keep Watch

Just when you thought the economy was the only good news you could count on, the stock market took a dive on the heels of Janet Yellen’s exit from the Federal Reserve. Suddenly, Americans everywhere wondered whether the volatility and uncertainty in Washington had finally caught up with the long, steady recovery stretching from those dark days in 2009. Should we be worried? Who’s looking out for the economy? And do they have a plan for the risks that await us in 2018 and beyond?

In this episode, USC Price School Dean Jack H. Knott interviews Atlanta Fed President Raphael W. Bostic on the state of the economy and the forces that keep it humming along.

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Dean Jack Knott in Conversation with Raphael Bostic

Jack Knott, the Dean and the C. Erwin and Ione L. Piper Chair and Professor of the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy had a conversation with USC Professor and President and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, Raphael Bostic.

Complications and Contradictions in a Changing Neighborhood

by Lisa Bates

The corridor of gleaming high rises along Vancouver and Williams Avenues is a marked change from the early 2000s. When the Housing Authority of Portland (now known as Home Forward) applied for HOPE VI funds for the old Iris Court development, it was known as a rough area. Residents who lived there, or who knew of it by reputation …

The Bloomberg 50 most influential in global business, 2017

Bloomberg:  From finance and politics to tech and entertainment, these people defined global business in 2017. Raphael Bostic PRESIDENT AND CEO, FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF ATLANTA While in the Obama administration, the University of Southern California economist fought housing discrimination against gays and racial minorities; he broke barriers when he was appointed by the board…

The Path Forward: Where Do We Go From Here?

Read Raphael Bostic’s last post in our partnership with Home Matters.

We have a long history of mobility. It’s one of the advances that set the New World apartfrom the Old. Our founders wanted us to move. They didn’t want us confined to the class we were born into or the name we were given or the land our parents could bestow on us. They wanted us to set out across this vast continent, and they didn’t want us to settle until we found a home we could call our own.

Access to Opportunity, the conceptual policy framework

In our last post, which also happened to be our first post, we introduced the Access to Opportunity project, including the first set of studies that will be undertaken as part of our larger research goals.  Though we didn’t state it, the choice of those projects was driven by a conceptual policy framework that evolved as we conducted our initial site visits in San Diego, Portland and Seattle.

by Dr. Raphael Bostic, President & Chief Executive Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, Professor, University of Southern California, Price School of Public Policy and Sheryl Whitney, Partner, Whitney Jennings