The Path Forward: Where Do We Go From Here?

Read Raphael Bostic’s last post in our partnership with Home Matters.

We have a long history of mobility. It’s one of the advances that set the New World apartfrom the Old. Our founders wanted us to move. They didn’t want us confined to the class we were born into or the name we were given or the land our parents could bestow on us. They wanted us to set out across this vast continent, and they didn’t want us to settle until we found a home we could call our own.

Access to Opportunity, the conceptual policy framework

In our last post, which also happened to be our first post, we introduced the Access to Opportunity project, including the first set of studies that will be undertaken as part of our larger research goals.  Though we didn’t state it, the choice of those projects was driven by a conceptual policy framework that evolved as we conducted our initial site visits in San Diego, Portland and Seattle.

by Dr. Raphael Bostic, President & Chief Executive Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, Professor, University of Southern California, Price School of Public Policy and Sheryl Whitney, Partner, Whitney Jennings

Stories from inside the battle for successful children and families

by Dr. Raphael Bostic and Sheryl Whitney

Opportunity. It has become the buzz word for policymakers across the political spectrum. From Paul Ryan to Barack Obama and Bernie Sanders to Donald Trump, everyone seems to trumpet the importance of Americans having access to good jobs, quality housing, strong education, healthy food, safe streets, clean air and water. But the more fundamental question is this: What can communities actually do to increase the likelihood that Americans have real access to opportunity?

The Reluctant Fundamentalist

The narrator of Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist may be unreliable as he tells his American experience before and after 9/11 with an unknown American dinner guest, but we wonder if he is any more unreliable than the voice inside all of us. We discuss the East/West conflict, the relationship between fundamentalism and nostalgia, the narrator’s reluctance and fundamentalism, the narrator’s love of America and Erica, as well as puzzle over the ending as we delve into this deep and short novel.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of The Reluctant Fundamentalist click the orange arrow in the Soundcloud player at the top of this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through iTunes, Soundcloud, or Google Play

The infrastructure needed to support a thriving California economy

Earlier this month, Gov. Jerry Brown and California legislators announced agreement on a bold plan to invest in the state’s crumbling roads and highways, putting aside years of disagreement to get people and goods moving through regions like Los Angeles again. Now, our leaders must act with the same resolve to increase the production of…

Survey shows impact of costly L.A. housing on employer-employee relationship

USC Professor Dr. Raphael Bostic and a team of USC researchers surveyed 14 major public and private sector Los Angeles employers that represent more than 200,000 employees. Survey questions included their views on how the cost of living affected their ability to attract and retain workers, how employees are handling the high costs and what…

Bonus- Cop in the Hood (part 2)

In part 2 of our discussion of Cop in the Hood by Peter Moskos, we discuss the notion of discretion in the legal system – by police all the way to prosecutors & parole/probation boards. We think about discrimination in enforcement made possible by discretion. We think about conflicts of interest in investigations of police misconduct – especially in relation to the war on drugs. How should we move forward?

Cop in the Hood

We ask how to define “good” policing, as we discuss sociologist Peter Moskos’ Cop in the Hood: My Year Policing Baltimore’s Eastern District. What expectations do we put on police officers? How do police departments measure success? What should we measure for success? What does “law and order” mean? Do police receive the right kind of training to deliver the service communities want them to provide? How does Baltimore differ from Los Angeles? We also discuss the epic policy failure of the War on Drugs and the idea of legalization.

The Holt Lecture: Journalism, Accountability, Power

Frederick J. Ryan, Jr. Publisher and Chief Executive Officer of The Washington Post. He previously served as the President and COO of Allbritton Communications Company and Founding CEO & President of Politico. He was the Chief of Staff for President Ronald Reagan (1989–1995), and currently serves as the Chairman of the Board of Trustees for the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation. Ryan…

CA employers can’t recruit ‘high-performers’ thanks to insane housing prices

Business Insider featured research by Raphael Bostic of the USC Price School and the Los Angeles Business Council finding the city’s high housing costs discourages outsiders from entering the Los Angeles job market. “There’s ample evidence to show that the time is now to implement strategies to reduce housing costs,” Bostic said. The story also…