The Joint Effects of Income, Vehicle Technology, and Rail Transit Access on Greenhouse Gas Emissions

New paper published: The Joint Effects of Income, Vehicle Technology, and Rail Transit Access on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Marlon G. Boarnet, Raphael W. Bostic, Andrew Eisenlohr, Seva Rodnyansky, Raúl Santiago-Bartolomei, Huê-Tâm Webb Jamme First Published July 28, 2018 Research Article  https://doi.org/10.1177/0361198118787087 * Abstract This paper examines the relationship between income, vehicle miles traveled (VMT), and…

New paper: Corporate charitable foundations, executive entrenchment, and shareholder distributions

New paper published: “Corporate charitable foundations, executive entrenchment, and shareholder distributions.”

Professor Nicolas J. Duquette, along with co-author, has a new paper in the Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Bedrosian Director presenting at the 2018 Congress & History Conference, Princeton

Jeffery Jenkins, Bedrosian Center Director, and co-author Thomas Gray will be presenting a paper at the 2018 Congress & History Conference at Prinecton University on June 7-8, 2018. The paper is titled “A Bridge Too Far?: Examining Bridging Assumptions in Common-Space Estimations.” It will be presented as part of a three paper panel on “Methodological…

New paper: Distributive politics and congressional voting: public lands reform in the Jacksonian era

New paper published: “Distributive politics and congressional voting: public lands reform in the Jacksonian era” by Sean Gailmard, Jeffery A. Jenkins

During the 1830s, Congress passed a series of laws reforming U.S. policy on acquiring public lands. These laws established a federal land policy of preemption, under which squatters on public land obtained legal title to it in exchange for payment of a minimum (and low) price per acre. Preemption significantly liberalized the terms of land ownership in the U.S. We analyze roll call voting on the preemption acts in Congress from a distributive politics perspective …

New Paper: Benefits-sharing agreements and nonideal theory: The warning signs of agreement co-optation

“Benefits-sharing agreements and nonideal theory: The warning signs of agreement co-optation”
Jovanna Rosen, Lisa Schweitzer

Community members seek benefits-sharing planning agreements to advance their own distributive justice goals by directing benefits to communities. Nonideal theory does much to explain the context and possibilities for these agreements. The agreements forged between communities and development interests seek to address, but not completely achieve, distributive justice via consensus …

New Paper: The Role of Clinics in Determining Older Recent Immigrants’ Use of Health Services

New publication from Emma Aguila: “The Role of Clinics in Determining Older Recent Immigrants’ Use of Health Services”

Older adults represent an increasing share of adults legally admitted to the U.S. [1]. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996 bars immigrants admitted as lawful permanent residents who have been in the U.S. < 5 years (hereafter referred to as recent immigrants) from receiving federally-funded Medicaid. States have the option of providing Medicaid benefits regardless of duration in the U.S. but few provide comprehensive coverage ...

New paper: Gender Difference and Intra-Household Economic Power in Mortgage Signing Order

New publication from Richard Green: “Gender Difference and Intra-Household Economic Power in Mortgage Signing Order.”

Gender difference is deeply rooted in our identity and has been widely documented by economists in disparate real-world economic contexts. For example, though women have made substantial labor market gains in both participation and earnings, gender inequality persists …

Location, Location, Location! Mobility and Opportunity in East King County

Emily Lieb brings us another research update from Seattle from the Access to Opportunity Project:

What’s in a neighborhood? Scholars (and realtors) agree: Where a person lives determines how much access to opportunity she has. Good schools, safe streets, high-quality housing that appreciates in value, accessible jobs and services, clean air and water—all of these things make it possible for people to do the best they can for themselves and their families. Poor schools, high crime rates, bad housing, an unhealthy environment, and relative inaccessibility do the opposite. Each one of these things is an obstacle standing between a family and its potential.

How do we know what works?

Lisa K. Bates, Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Urban Studies in the Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning at Portland State University, updates us on research in the Access to Opportunity Project.

When thinking about assessing the impact of Humboldt Gardens’ GOALS program, which is the project‘s version of HUD‘s Family Self-Sufficiency Program (FSS), it is useful to know the program‘s context. The concept of FSS is straightforward — parents participate in programming designed to promote employment and financial stability, working with a case manager to set goals.

Changing Lives in a Changing Neighborhood

By Dr. Lisa K. Bates

Joining the Access to Opportunity team is bringing me into dialogue with amazing scholars and practitioners with deep understanding of policy systems, focusing on an under-studied context of west coast cities. I am looking forward to sharing the research from Portland as we complete this initial round of work. We are looking at Humboldt Gardens, a development of Home Forward (the Housing Authority of Portland), as a site for understanding low-income parents’ (mostly parents of color) strategies for accessing ‘opportunity’.