Job One at Homeland Security Under Trump: Immigration

The New York Times quoted Erroll Southers of the USC Price School on the reasons to protect grant funding for programs that combat domestic extremism. Cutting grant programs that combat domestic extremism is a mistake when attacks by white supremacist and other hate groups are on the rise, said Erroll Southers, a former F.B.I. agent…

Migrant Entrepreneurs: The In-Between Advantage

Immigrants exist between two words: their country of origin and their new home. In this nexus lies unique challenges—and opportunities. The immigrant communities who maintain bonds with their origin, or “diasporas,” can bring what they have learned back with them. They can transform developing nations and spur economic growth with their entrepreneurship. They can bridge the divide between the prosperous and the poor—and inspire lasting change.

In this episode, we explore these transformative individuals with Jennifer Brinkerhoff.

Listen to this episode by clicking on the orange play arrow to the right here, or subscribe at iTunes, Soundcloud, or Google Play.

American Gods

The novel is a fascinating exploration of the meaning of ethnicity, modernism, memory, and community in which we are reminded of the many ethnicities that make up America, but also their amalgamation into a secular American society with few gods. As multiple characters remind us, America is a hard place to be a god. This is a quintessential American novel from a quintessential British storyteller – it’s a sprawling road trip into the vast highways and byways of the American landscape, it’s a horror novel, a mystery, a romance, a western, a fantasy, and ultimately a look into the heart of America.

This podcast features Caroline Bhalla, Raphael Bostic, Lisa Schweitzer, and David Sloane

Drown

Featuring Caroline Bhalla, Raphael Bostic,Elizabeth Currid-Halkett, and Richard Green

Junot Díaz made his debut with Drown, ten interconnected short stories in 1997. These coming-of-age stories grant the reader a brief glimpse into the lives of immigrants, their lives in poverty in the Dominican Republic through migration to life on the edges in New Jersey. “Diaz evokes a world in which fathers are gone, mothers fight with grim determination for their families and themselves, and the next generation inherits the casual cruelty, devastating ambivalence, and knowing humor of lives circumscribed by poverty and uncertainty.”

Bedrosian Center, SCI event spotlights refugee experience, from vetting to resettlement

In collaboration with the Safe Communities Institute, we hosted a discussion on the experiences and impact of refugees who arrive in the U.S. in search of their new home. Professor Raphael Bostic moderated a panel featuring Ehsan Zaffar, senior advisor for the Department of Homeland Security’s Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties; Meymuna Hussein-Cattan, executive director of Tiyya, an organization that serves refugees; and USC Social Work Associate Dean Cherrie Short.

A Conversation with Journalist Pilar Marrero: Toxic Immigration Rhetoric and America’s Future

Last Wednesday, we had the pleasure of welcoming journalist Pilar Marrero for a conversation with our own Sherry Bebitch Jeffe about toxic immigration rhetoric and the 2016 Presidential Election. Pilar Marrero is an immigration expert; she’s been covering social and political issues pertaining to the Latinx community in the U.S. for over 20 years. She…

Letter to a Trump Supporter #1: Undocumented Immigration

We will all remember this election. Our children and grandchildren will read about it. They will ask us what it was like to live through it. They will want to know what we did, where we stood, how we voted. This is the record I will leave behind. Throughout this election season, I have been…