PIPE* Workshop: Nicolas Napolio, USC

Verna and Peter Dauterive Hall(VPD) 645 Exposition Boulevard, #203, Los Angeles, CA 90089, Los Angeles

"Implementing Particularism: Bureaucracy and the Distribution of Federal Grants" Under what conditions do bureaucrats implement policy on behalf of the President? Do ideology and politicization condition agency implementation of presidential…

PIPE Workshop: Janna King, USC

Verna and Peter Dauterive Hall(VPD) 645 Exposition Boulevard, #203, Los Angeles, CA 90089, Los Angeles

Bureaucratic Agency Problems and Legislative Oversight (co-authored with Abby K. Wood, USC Gould and Sean Gailmard, UC Berkeley) This paper empirically analyzes legislative oversight of bureaucracy in the US as…

PIPE Workshop: Abby K. Wood, USC

HOLD THE DATE!  More information will be posted soon.  This workshop is open to USC students & faculty.

PIPE* Workshop: Leah Stokes, UC Santa Barbara

Sol Price School of Public Policy Ralph and Goldy Lewis Hall, Room 103 650 Childs Way, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0626, Los Angeles

Legislative Staff and Representation in Congress: Do they understand their constituents' policy preferences? Previous research has indicated that political elites have, at best, a murky understanding of their constituents' policy…

PIPE* Workshop: Seth Hill, UC San Diego

Sol Price School of Public Policy Ralph and Goldy Lewis Hall 650 Childs Way, Room 103, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0626, Los Angeles

Sidestepping Primary Reform: Political Action in Response to Institutional Change Many believe that primary elections distort representation in American legislatures because unrepresentative actors nominate extremist candidates. Advocates have reformed primaries…

PIPE Workshop featuring Michael Hankinson

Virtual

"The Supply-Equity Trade-off: The Effect of Spatial Representation on the Local Housing Supply"

Michael Hankinson, assistant professor of Political Science at George Washington University, will discuss his research. A central concern of governance is how the costs and benefits of collective goods are distributed over the population. Our findings speak to a trade-off inherent to spatial representation: the supply of collective goods and the equitable distribution of the associated costs.