Tag: Congress

September 16, 2020
January 25, 2019
November 14, 2018
October 23, 2018

Two former Congressmen discussed opportunities for bipartisan leadership and how to build political consensus. By: Yuming Fang Originally posted at USC Annenberg Media, October 22 at 5:12 PM Two men who…

September 21, 2018

by Pamela Clouser McCann Bridges to nowhere, airports named for legislators, and construction signage regarding taxpayer dollars at work—these are typical accoutrements of legislative office.  Showing your constituents what you…

September 17, 2018
August 17, 2018
June 14, 2018
June 12, 2018

by Anthony Orlando Power is up for grabs in Washington. A controversial President, an unpopular Congress, and a midterm election all make 2018 a battleground for political control. Who will win?…

June 6, 2018
May 29, 2018

Congressional historian Sarah Binder joins neighbor and investment manager, Matt Spindel in a look at the history of the relationship between the Federal Reserve and its legislative parent, Congress. The result is the Princeton University Press book The Myth of Independence: How Congress Governs the Federal Reserve.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of The Myth of Independence, click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcasts, Soundcloud, Google Play, Stitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

May 15, 2018

We’re six months away from one of the most consequential midterm elections in modern history, and Americans are fed up with Congress. Politicians have gotten a bad rap throughout history, but today’s legislators are setting record lows in approval ratings and public trust. What gives? Why do they disappoint us so often? Are they really ignoring our needs and demands, or are we misunderstanding the challenges they face?

In this episode, Sarah Anderson shows that it’s a little of both: politicians don’t listen to all constituents equally, but they also can’t just snap their fingers and fulfill our wishes.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or download it and subscribe through ApplePodcasts, Soundcloud, Google Play, Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

April 25, 2018

Congressional primaries, like primary elections in general, are imagined to give voters, rather than party elites, the ability to choose which candidate wins the nomination. Indeed, we might expect primary election outcomes to reflect the preferences of the median primary voter, in roughly the way we expect general election outcomes to reflect the preferences of the overall district median.

We challenge this conventional wisdom.

April 11, 2018

The Challenge of Measuring Political Polarization in the US over Time using Congressional Roll Call Votes Jeff Lewis is professor of Political Science, UCLA. He is also the current president…

March 21, 2018
December 2, 2017

Nearly 20 years ago, Stanford Professor Keith Krehbiel wrote a book showing that political parties are less important in legislative-executive politics than previously thought — challenging previous assumptions of American politics and influencing the work of many up-and-coming scholars. USC Price School of Public Policy Provost Professor Jeffery Jenkins was completing graduate school when Krehbiel released Pivotal Politics: A Theory of U.S. Lawmaking in 1998.

August 22, 2015
August 21, 2015

Governmental public policies provide a framework for programs, services, and resource allocations to address societal problems. The bicameral nature of the United States Congress provides a setting for conflict not just on whether to reform existing policy, but on what policy instruments to employ. 

April 23, 2015

by Pamela McCann Solving our enormous policy problems in today’s complex world requires a balance of appetite for change, capacity for reform, and fortitude.  Although not all societal problems require…

November 20, 2013

by Jeremy Loudenback Even as Congresswoman Karen Bass has ascended to the highest levels of government, she hasn’t forgotten her roots in community organizing South Los Angeles.  Though she now roams…

February 18, 2011

Governance Salon featuring Michael Neblo, Ohio State University   Participatory democrats often criticize deliberative democracy as an inefficient, elitist, technocratic attempt to manipulate the public toward policies favored by elites.…