Toward a Theory of Population Repatriation from Disasters

“Toward a Theory of Population Repatriation from Disasters,” August 2018. Adam Rose, Jonathan Eyer and Shingo Nagamatsu

Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to present the outlines of a conceptual framework of the economics of population repatriation following disasters. It is acknowledged that economics is only one major dimension of the issue, but it is intended . . .

PS You’re Busted: How bridging silos in research & practice can impact human trafficking irl

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks about human trafficking with Greg DeAngelo, Associate Professor of Economic Studies at Claremont Graduate University. How does an economist get data on human trafficking, and other black market enterprises? What are the pressing questions law enforcement have that academics could help?

America, Heck Yeah! Public Schools & Baseball

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and D. Roderick (Rod) Kiewiet, Professor of Political Science at Caltech, break down the long standing myth of the equalizing force of public education. We hold the idea that public schools present Americans with equal opportunity. Kiewiet gets to the reality through public school funding in California compared to the nation.

California needs public infrastructure, but not a bullet train

The Sacramento Bee published commentary by Dana Goldman and Richard Green of the USC Price School on California’s need for public infrastructure in lieu of a high-speed rail. Current financing comes from $9 billion in state bonds and $3.5 billion in federal grants. But under Brown’s leadership, California has failed to address its other unfunded infrastructure needs, they wrote.

The Myth of Independence

Congressional historian Sarah Binder joins neighbor and investment manager, Matt Spindel in a look at the history of the relationship between the Federal Reserve and its legislative parent, Congress. The result is the Princeton University Press book The Myth of Independence: How Congress Governs the Federal Reserve.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of The Myth of Independence, click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

Radical Markets

In Radical Markets, Eric A. Posner and E. Glen Weyl envision new rules for markets in order to limit the tyranny of monopolies and majority rule. Their aim, with 5 revolutionary ideas to cure what they see as the most important issue of our time: inequality.

What are some of these “radical” ideas, and does our panel think they are the revolutionary ideas we need?

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of Radical Markets, click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

Bonus – Interview with E. Glen Weyl

An interview with one of the co-authors of Radical Markets: Uprooting Capitalism and Democracy for a Just Society, E. Glen Weyl. (Follow Glen on Twitter: @glenweyl)

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of this bonus interview with E. Glen Weyl, click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

How Do the Rich Spend Their Money and Why Has It Changed?

Is conspicuous consumption a thing of the past? What are today’s wealthy spending their money on? In today’s episode of Our American Discourse, Elizabeth Currid-Halkett helps us walk a mile in the shoes of the spending habits of today’s “aspirational class.”

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

The Risky, Rocky Ride of Today’s Economy . . . and the Central Bankers Who Keep Watch

Just when you thought the economy was the only good news you could count on, the stock market took a dive on the heels of Janet Yellen’s exit from the Federal Reserve. Suddenly, Americans everywhere wondered whether the volatility and uncertainty in Washington had finally caught up with the long, steady recovery stretching from those dark days in 2009. Should we be worried? Who’s looking out for the economy? And do they have a plan for the risks that await us in 2018 and beyond?

In this episode, USC Price School Dean Jack H. Knott interviews Atlanta Fed President Raphael W. Bostic on the state of the economy and the forces that keep it humming along.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

New paper: Gender Difference and Intra-Household Economic Power in Mortgage Signing Order

New publication from Richard Green: “Gender Difference and Intra-Household Economic Power in Mortgage Signing Order.”

Gender difference is deeply rooted in our identity and has been widely documented by economists in disparate real-world economic contexts. For example, though women have made substantial labor market gains in both participation and earnings, gender inequality persists …