Aguila new paper on the effect supplemental income programs have on primary caregiver burdens in Mexico

Do Income Supplemental Programs for Older Adults’ Help Reduce Primary Caregiver Burden? Evidence from Mexico Article is in the Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, published online June 5, 2019 by Emma Aguila, Mariana López-Ortega, Sean Angst. Abstract: In countries such as Mexico without formal public long-term care policies, informal care becomes the main source of support for…

A spoonful less sugar helps the obesity rates go down

by Olivia Olson

While consumers frequently vilify fat, salt, or red meat, most fail to acknowledge sugar’s role in obesity and overweight. In the past 60 years of increased health consciousness, sugar has managed to largely avoid blame, and indeed increase its presence in a wide variety of ‘fat free,’ ‘gluten free,’ or ‘all natural’ ‘health foods.’

An unHappy Meal: how government spending forced reliance on fast food

by Olivia Olson

Those living in poverty are among the victims of a system that renders fast food and other such unhealthy products the only viable options for low-income citizens. From commodity crop subsidies, to federal programs that place fast food in the heart of urban areas, obesity is not “a moral lapse of a brain chemical but the effect of poverty.”

New Paper: The Role of Clinics in Determining Older Recent Immigrants’ Use of Health Services

New publication from Emma Aguila: “The Role of Clinics in Determining Older Recent Immigrants’ Use of Health Services”

Older adults represent an increasing share of adults legally admitted to the U.S. [1]. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996 bars immigrants admitted as lawful permanent residents who have been in the U.S. < 5 years (hereafter referred to as recent immigrants) from receiving federally-funded Medicaid. States have the option of providing Medicaid benefits regardless of duration in the U.S. but few provide comprehensive coverage ...

Autopsy of a Failed Health Insurance Experiment: Did It Die of Natural Causes, or Was It Murdered?

It was just another week for the Trump administration. A senior official resigned after admitting to major ethics violations, the President insulted millions of innocent brown-skinned Americans on Twitter, and quietly—so quietly that almost no one noticed—the Department of Health and Human Services pulled another Jenga block out of the teetering tower that is the Affordable Care Act. Fortunately, it did not fall.

But it did become more expensive. And in that understated tragedy, we find our mystery: Was that HHS’s intent all along?

This essay was originally published on the “Bill of Health” blog at Harvard Law School.

Healthcare diversity program aims to educate, inspire future leaders

This summer, a group of students spent a day volunteering to cook lunch and sort clothes at the Downtown Women’s Center, an organization dedicated helping women overcome poverty and homelessness. The service activity helped them gain “a sense of the social determinants of health,” according to USC Price School of Public Policy Professor LaVonna Lewis,…

Studying Senior Care in China

by Justine Dodgen Last month, I left for Beijing, China for the Price International Lab with eighteen of my fellow Price students. Together, we represented five of Price’s graduate degree programs, the Los Angeles and Sacramento campuses, and local and international students. This diverse group set out to put our learning into practice by providing consulting…

This Exercise Craze Is Giving Low-Income Women A Chance To Prioritize Their Health

Bedrosian Faculty Affiliate LaVonna Lewis spoke to Daina Beth Solomon about how affordable exercise classes can have great affect for low-income women. Policymakers and nonprofit leaders, in contrast, have focused their health efforts largely on nutrition because food comes before exercise for low-income families, according to Professor Lavonna Lewis of the University of Southern California’s Public…