Who Has the Ear of Your Legislators and Why They Can’t Seem to Get Anything Done

We’re six months away from one of the most consequential midterm elections in modern history, and Americans are fed up with Congress. Politicians have gotten a bad rap throughout history, but today’s legislators are setting record lows in approval ratings and public trust. What gives? Why do they disappoint us so often? Are they really ignoring our needs and demands, or are we misunderstanding the challenges they face?

In this episode, Sarah Anderson shows that it’s a little of both: politicians don’t listen to all constituents equally, but they also can’t just snap their fingers and fulfill our wishes.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

“I am a powerful agent of change. I am deliberate. And I am not afraid.”

Native American award-winning film director and producer, actor, singer/songwriter, author, and founder and CEO of multiple media organizations, humanitarian Joanelle Romero. Joanelle was born in both the artistic and activist worlds and has spent her life bringing those two realms together. Listen to Joanelle share stories about her many years’ being an artist and humanitarian, and from where she draws all the necessary strength in a climate where the Native American—and especially the Native woman—is absent from virtually all popular media.

Stream the interview here, or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcasts, Soundcloud, or GooglePlay.

Radical Markets

In Radical Markets, Eric A. Posner and E. Glen Weyl envision new rules for markets in order to limit the tyranny of monopolies and majority rule. Their aim, with 5 revolutionary ideas to cure what they see as the most important issue of our time: inequality.

What are some of these “radical” ideas, and does our panel think they are the revolutionary ideas we need?

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of Radical Markets, click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

Millennials Knocking on the Door of the American Dream

What is the American Dream through the eyes of Millennials?
Listen to the new episode of Our American Discourse to hear how Prof Dowell Myers is questioning the fate of Millennials as they work toward opportunities and the future.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”

USC Price student-led forum focuses on issues of identity, resistance

“In order for us to be inclusive, we need to really highlight that representation matters and include as many people, organizations, thought processes and concerns that people may have,” said Malaika Merid, a second-year Master of Public Policy Student at USC Price who was one of the event organizers. “This is a gathering space of real diverse thought, and I think that the best way for us to move forward with that is to keep creating ways to find more diversity of thought to be included within the forum.”

Trump Makes California Grate Again

Fox & Hounds Daily published commentary by Sherry Bebitch Jeffe of the USC Price School and Doug Jeffe on the continued tension between President Donald Trump and the majority of California voters. All in all, besides lousy traffic, Trump’s visit meant little to most Californians. And the optics of the military and the “wall” didn’t…

Edwin Bender column: Wanted: civic courage

Richmond Times-Dispatch cited research by Abby Wood (USC Gould) and colleagues that found disclosure of signatures on a ballot measures does not chill free speech. New cutting-edge studies by scholars, including Abby Wood of University of Southern California and Douglas Spencer of the University of Connecticut, are beginning to provide the type of evidence Justice Thomas…

New paper: Distributive politics and congressional voting: public lands reform in the Jacksonian era

New paper published: “Distributive politics and congressional voting: public lands reform in the Jacksonian era” by Sean Gailmard, Jeffery A. Jenkins

During the 1830s, Congress passed a series of laws reforming U.S. policy on acquiring public lands. These laws established a federal land policy of preemption, under which squatters on public land obtained legal title to it in exchange for payment of a minimum (and low) price per acre. Preemption significantly liberalized the terms of land ownership in the U.S. We analyze roll call voting on the preemption acts in Congress from a distributive politics perspective …

In Defense of Our Political Party System (Sort Of)”

Did the recent government shutdown cause your confidence in government to soar?

We thought not. Luckily, Anthony spoke with UC San Diego prof Thad Kousser about where gridlock comes from, what to do about it, and whether politicians really deserve all the blame they get.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”