Who’s Really in Charge? Government Bureaucracy Under Attack

Bureaucracy is so boring. Who cares? Not you, right? Well then, you’re in for an unwelcome surprise because the people who run our government from day to day aren’t the ones you voted for. Our democracy depends on the men and women of the bureaucracy. They execute the laws, and lately they’ve been doing it without supportive leadership, without the trust of the public … without a voice.

In this episode, William Resh is their voice, and we would be wise to listen.

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Spring 2016 Book Launch Celebration! (photos)

The USC Price Faculty Book Launch for Spring 2016 featured two great books by Price Faculty, Annette M. Kim and William G. Resh. Sidewalk City With Sidewalk City, Annette Miae Kim provides the first multidisciplinary case study of sidewalks in a distinctive geographical area. She focuses on Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, a rapidly growing and evolving…

Resh publishes new article in premier Public Administration journal

A new article co-authored by Bedrosian Faculty Affiliate Bill Resh was accepted into the  Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory. The article, entitled “A Systems Theory Approach to Innovation Implementation: Why Organizational Location Matters,” examines how the “success” of adopted innovations depends on both the source of innovation and the organizational environment. Resh and coauthor Tima Moldogaziev argue that not…

Government 2.0

The shift from the modern industrial era into the new, post-modern Information Age presents contemporary society with a rather significant paradox. On one hand, there is fairly widespread agreement that the governmental apparatus established to implement public policies – the bureaucracy – is not very efficient or effective. On the other, there is equally widespread belief that bureaucracy is necessary in order to successfully implement those policies. We are stuck in something of a love/hate, “can’t live with it, can’t live without it” dilemma when it comes to the presence of the large bureaucratic systems, at all levels of government, that are critical to the actual delivery of services that constitute the ultimate operationalization of legislative dictates.