Tag: Raphael Bostic

February 26, 2016

Your Heart is a Muscle the Size of a Fist imagines what it means to be empathetic within the institutional violence of our system and the violence humans can commit against each other. Listen to our discussion about power and the necessity of protest within our democratic structure, and how protests should, and can, peacefully engage to solve the world’s “wicked problems.”

February 22, 2016
February 16, 2016

Raphael Bostic joined Take Two to discuss a new study on new luxury apartments and low-income renters in the area of development.     Listen to the full discussion.

February 10, 2016
February 9, 2016
February 4, 2016
January 25, 2016

What is the great tragedy in The Tragedy of Richard II? What makes a good leader – a king, a president? Can Shakespeare inform political discussions today? Listen and see what our guests think.

January 15, 2016
January 12, 2016

On January 12th in Washington DC, HUD’s Office of Policy Development and Research commemorated HUD’s 50 years. Raphael Bostic, the Judith and John Bedrosian Chair in Governance and the Public Enterprise at the…

December 21, 2015

Alan Ehrenhalt argues that the demographics of the urban and suburban landscape are in the midst of a grand change in the book The Great Inversion. After the great sprawl of the 50s, the affluent are reclaiming urban spaces while minorities and immigrants are moving to the edges. New urbanism is winning and Ehrenhalt uses several examples to prove his point. Find out if our readers agreed with the thesis.

December 15, 2015

Part memoir, part history, Treuer writes about reservations within the boundaries of the United States. This book should be an essential read for all Americans. Find out why Treuer decided to write the book, some challenges he faced along the way, and what might be coming next.

November 25, 2015

In Rez Life David Treuer spirals in and out of personal story, interviews, and historical narrative to paint a full picture of life as an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation. An important book about the power of individual and collective action, the power of place, and how history lives on in our (collective) lives today.

November 25, 2015
November 5, 2015
October 29, 2015
October 26, 2015

What I Saw at the Revolution is a political memoir for those who don’t usually read political memoirs, a testimony to the power of language in politics. Noonan was a speechwriter for President Reagan, in both of his terms. Join us for a conversation on the power of language in politics and for a look at how our Federal government works.

October 24, 2015

Raphael Bostic participated in the Fordham Urban Law Journal’s eighth annual Cooper-Walsh Colloquium on October 23. The articles presented during the colloquium will be published in spring 2016 as part of…

October 22, 2015
October 15, 2015
October 12, 2015
October 2, 2015
October 1, 2015
September 29, 2015

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates is ostensibly a letter to his son about growing up a black male in America. This prize winning correspondent of The Atlantic tackles the very big questions of our time.

September 23, 2015
September 9, 2015