How do we know what works?

Lisa K. Bates, Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Urban Studies in the Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning at Portland State University, updates us on research in the Access to Opportunity Project.

When thinking about assessing the impact of Humboldt Gardens’ GOALS program, which is the project‘s version of HUD‘s Family Self-Sufficiency Program (FSS), it is useful to know the program‘s context. The concept of FSS is straightforward — parents participate in programming designed to promote employment and financial stability, working with a case manager to set goals.

The Great American Housing Finance System and the Role of the Federal Government

Housing is local, but money is global. What is the best way to allocate our resources toward housing affordability? How far are we from that goal? How do we even agree on what affordability means?

In this episode, our resident housing finance expert Richard K. Green will walk us step-by-step through these winding routes we’ve constructed to access the American dream.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the Soundcloud player here. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, or Google Play.

Access to Opportunity, the conceptual policy framework

In our last post, which also happened to be our first post, we introduced the Access to Opportunity project, including the first set of studies that will be undertaken as part of our larger research goals.  Though we didn’t state it, the choice of those projects was driven by a conceptual policy framework that evolved as we conducted our initial site visits in San Diego, Portland and Seattle.

by Dr. Raphael Bostic, President & Chief Executive Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, Professor, University of Southern California, Price School of Public Policy and Sheryl Whitney, Partner, Whitney Jennings

Ben Carson tapped to address housing issues, but is he qualified?

President-elect Donald Trump has picked former campaign rival Ben Carson to lead the Department of Housing and Urban Development, or HUD. Is Ben Carson the man to run HUD? “He’s certainly not qualified from any conventional standpoint,” says Richard Green, director and chair of the USC Lusk Center for Real Estate. There is more to…

Raphael Bostic on KPCC’s AirTalk: Dr. Ben Carson, HUD & Impact on So Cal Housing Policy

How Ben Carson at HUD could impact Los Angeles housing In his latest cabinet member choice, President-elect Trump surprised many when he tapped former GOP presidential rival Dr. Ben Carson for Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The announcement, which came Monday morning, 12/5/2016, is a continuation of Trump’s theme…

When Your Livelihood Is Too Far Away: Housing as a Platform to Jobs

A couple years ago, some of my colleagues at USC set out to answer an old question with a new twist. They wanted to know how many jobs you could find if you lived in a low-income neighborhood. Specifically, they wanted to know how many jobs you could commute to.

Most Americans take it for granted that employment is place-based. You can’t work at a building that’s too far away. But what happens when you can only afford to live in a few of neighborhoods in a city, a reality that many low-income families face? How many jobs are too far away?

HUD at 50

On January 12th in Washington DC, HUD’s Office of Policy Development and Research commemorated HUD’s 50 years. Raphael Bostic, the Judith and John Bedrosian Chair in Governance and the Public Enterprise at the Sol Price School of Public Policy, co-authored HUD at 50: Creating Pathways to Opportunity (see Chapter 3) and was a discussant on the panel of The Evolution of HUD’s Policies…