Tag: PIPE

December 5, 2020

Rachel Van Sickle-Ward, Professor of Political Studies at Claremont University, along with Kevin Wallsten, Associate Professor of Political Science at CSULB, will present their research. Check back for more details.

November 7, 2020
October 21, 2020

Clayton Nall, Assistant Professor of Political Science at University of California Santa Barbara, will present his research. Please check back for more details.

October 10, 2020
September 23, 2020

“Political Legitimacy and the Institutional Foundations of Constitutional Government: The Case of England”

Presented by Jared Rubin, Professor, Chapman University.

September 9, 2020

as to whether legislators bring this preference for reciprocity to Congress. Through an original survey experiment and observational studies of end-of-career behavior, Christian finds consistent evidence that legislators have an intrinsic preference for reciprocity. Moreover, legislators are aware that their colleagues have this preference, so it likely enters into their strategic calculations. This finding raises new questions for research in party discipline, partisan polarization, and interest group influence, and others.

August 26, 2020

“The Supply-Equity Trade-off: The Effect of Spatial Representation on the Local Housing Supply”

Michael Hankinson, assistant professor of Political Science at George Washington University, will discuss his research. A central concern of governance is how the costs and benefits of collective goods are distributed over the population. Our findings speak to a trade-off inherent to spatial representation: the supply of collective goods and the equitable distribution of the associated costs.

June 11, 2020
February 26, 2020
February 26, 2020

Choosing Racial Identity in the United States, 1880-1940

Emily Nix’s paper documents that many black males experienced a change in racial classification to white in the United States, 1880 – 1940, while changes in racial classification were negligible for other races

February 24, 2020

Going into the 2020 election, popular fear of interference, fraud, or election meddling, means that leveraging the tools of rigorous social science is as important as ever.

Participants in the USC Bedrosian Center’s Symposium on Election Administration and Technology skillfully brought data, theory, and logic to bear on questions often driven by reflexive fear, anger, or confusion.

January 22, 2020
August 27, 2019

Campaign Finance Transparency Affects Legislators’ Election Outcomes and Behavior Do audits by executive agencies impact the behavior of those audited? Does revealing negative information about legislators affect electoral results and…

March 25, 2019
February 12, 2019

by Casey Fischl

Anthony Orlando discussed one of his current research projects, When Citizens Peek Behind the Bureaucratic Veil: An Experiment in Shaping Public Opinion, coauthored by Professor Bill Resh and Ph.D. student, Colin Leslie of the Sol Price School of Public Policy.

January 15, 2019

by Casey Fischl

Philip Potter discussed his research paper, “Political Violence in China: Terrorism, Official Media, and Political Priorities,” during the January 15, 2019 PIPE Workshop. His research focuses on terrorism and counterterrorism in China, to answer the question of why it is critical that the United States begins to pay more attention to the current state of affairs in China.

December 17, 2018

by Nathan K. Micatka and Nicholas Napolio  On December 4, 2018, a group of scholars gathered at the University of Southern California to present research and perspectives on foreign policy in the age…

November 19, 2018
October 9, 2018

Ben Graham is an assistant professor at USC’s School of International Relations. Ben discussed his paper, Network Ties and the Political Strategies of Firms, co-written with Cesi Cruz. Abstract: Social ties are critical to…

September 26, 2018

Creativity, Energy, & Experimentation In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and Benjamin Newman, Associate Professor of Public Policy and Political Science at the UC Riverside, discuss creativity…

June 14, 2018
April 25, 2018

Congressional primaries, like primary elections in general, are imagined to give voters, rather than party elites, the ability to choose which candidate wins the nomination. Indeed, we might expect primary election outcomes to reflect the preferences of the median primary voter, in roughly the way we expect general election outcomes to reflect the preferences of the overall district median.

We challenge this conventional wisdom.

April 11, 2018

The Challenge of Measuring Political Polarization in the US over Time using Congressional Roll Call Votes Jeff Lewis is professor of Political Science, UCLA. He is also the current president…

April 4, 2018

With the goal of fostering cross-disciplinary synergies among political economy scholars and fill the need for a regular meeting place, the USC PIPE Collaborative hosted the First Annual Political Institutions and Political Economy Conference on March 15-16, convening major U.S. scholars from political science, economics, and law to cover important new research on topics such as the unilateral presidency, Congressional committees, city policies, electoral rules, political leadership, and partisanship.