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PIPE Workshop: Anna Harvey, NYU

“Reducing Racial Disparities in Crime Victimization: Evidence From Employment Discrimination Litigation”   Black Americans are substantially less safe than white Americans, with persistently higher risks of crime victimization. One possible cause of racial disparities in crime victimization may lie in racially disparate law enforcement responses to crime experienced by Black Read more…

PIPE Workshop: Zhao Li, Princeton

Zhao Li, Assistant Professor of Politics and Public Affairs at Princeton University, studies American politics and political economy with a focus on campaign finance in the United States. In particular, her research examines both institutional and behavioral factors that motivate campaign donors to give money to different types of recipients (candidates, interest groups, etc.), as well as the implications of these donations for different aspects of democratic representation in the U.S., including corporate political strategy, political extremism, and electoral accountability.

Slavery & Its Legacies Symposium

Slavery, as an institution, traces its origins back to Mesopotamia in 3500 B.C. Slavery was abolished by most nations sometime in the 19th century. Slavery’s effects, however, persisted in many nations for decades — and still persist in various forms today. The Slavery and Its Legacies Symposium examines this historical persistence of institutionalized slavery, both in the United States and in other nations.

PIPE Workshop featuring Christian Fong

as to whether legislators bring this preference for reciprocity to Congress. Through an original survey experiment and observational studies of end-of-career behavior, Christian finds consistent evidence that legislators have an intrinsic preference for reciprocity. Moreover, legislators are aware that their colleagues have this preference, so it likely enters into their strategic calculations. This finding raises new questions for research in party discipline, partisan polarization, and interest group influence, and others.

PIPE Workshop featuring Michael Hankinson

“The Supply-Equity Trade-off: The Effect of Spatial Representation on the Local Housing Supply”

Michael Hankinson, assistant professor of Political Science at George Washington University, will discuss his research. A central concern of governance is how the costs and benefits of collective goods are distributed over the population. Our findings speak to a trade-off inherent to spatial representation: the supply of collective goods and the equitable distribution of the associated costs.

Timely election administration and technology symposium draws leading scholars

Going into the 2020 election, popular fear of interference, fraud, or election meddling, means that leveraging the tools of rigorous social science is as important as ever.

Participants in the USC Bedrosian Center’s Symposium on Election Administration and Technology skillfully brought data, theory, and logic to bear on questions often driven by reflexive fear, anger, or confusion.

Bedrosian Center