What promises do we have to keep? : A Call for Bipartisan Action on Climate Change

by Casey Fischl

Across the globe, countries acknowledge climate change as a scientific fact and have been implementing mitigation and adaptation strategies as per their commitment in the Paris Agreement. This, however, is not the case for the United States where political leaders are still debating and questioning what 97 percent of climate scientists agree on: climate-warming trends over the past century are extremely likely due to human activities.

USC Price Hosts Intelligence Analyst To Discuss Mueller Report

“The importance of having Malcolm here is you’ve got a person who has tracked and cataloged and written about this issue since it started,” Southers said. “We had a packed house, and I’m really encouraged by the diversity of people that came out in terms of age, gender, nationality, ethnicity and religion. I don’t think it’s a partisan issue. The American public wants to know what exactly is happening to our government and, more importantly, what this means for 2020.”

Antigone

This month, Lisa is joined by Carla Della Gatta and Richard Green to discuss the timeless play by Sophocles: Antigone.

The play has clear connections to political struggles we face thousands of years later. The struggle between law and norm, the struggle to define what the state can control, and more. Listen as our three scholars discuss the necessity of reading Antigone today.

Fear: Trump in the White House

This month, Lisa is joined by Anthony Orlando, Jeff Jenkins, and Christian Grose to discuss Bob Woodward’s latest reportage on the Presidency: Fear. How does this stack up to other Woodward titles and how does the principal agent theory work it’s way into conversation with these political junkies?

Martin Gilens

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks economic and political inequality in democracies with Martin Gilens, Professor of Public Policy at UCLA Luskin. The degree of political influence is dramatically unequal for people within the United States, public policy can help increase democratic representation and Gilens walks us through some history as he expresses policy options to get us to more democracy, rather than less.

Radical Markets

In Radical Markets, Eric A. Posner and E. Glen Weyl envision new rules for markets in order to limit the tyranny of monopolies and majority rule. Their aim, with 5 revolutionary ideas to cure what they see as the most important issue of our time: inequality.

What are some of these “radical” ideas, and does our panel think they are the revolutionary ideas we need?

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of Radical Markets, click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

Who Do Politicians Really Represent & Do We Notice?

With Donald Trump’s approval ratings at record lows, it’s worth asking how much this one number matters…and whether the people who approve really are better represented by him than the people who don’t. If our politicians really do represent some Americans better than others, it calls into question the very foundational ideals of our representative democracy.

In this episode, Brian Newman uncovers who’s represented, who’s not, and how it affects their view of government.

To listen to this episode of Our American Discourse, click the arrow in the player here. Or  download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle Play,  Stitcher, or your favorite podcasting app – click the links or search “usc bedrosian.”