Tag: political economy

May 8, 2019

Jeff Jenkins talks with Pamela Ban, UC San Diego about her recent research. First, she looks at how policy outcomes might change as Congress has a bit more gender representations. Then they discuss the revolving door and lobbying – how the cool off period has affected the lobbying industry. Finally, she thinks about how to use empirical data from newspapers to think about political power.

March 18, 2019

By Matthew Kredell

In the early history of the United States, settlers moved west into unsurveyed land and built homes and farms without regard to land title.

As the country expanded, one of the federal government’s chief means of acquiring revenue was the sale of public land. When the government put land up for auction, frontier settlers were at risk of losing their homes or farms.

December 5, 2018

PS You’re Busted: How bridging silos in research & practice can impact human trafficking irl In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks about human trafficking with Greg…

November 20, 2018

? America, Heck Yeah! Public Schools & Baseball In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and D. Roderick (Rod) Kiewiet, Professor of Political Science at Caltech, break down…

October 22, 2018

Social Network Roles in Foreign Capital and Research In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and Benjamin A. T. Graham, assistant professor in the School of International Relations…

April 4, 2018

With the goal of fostering cross-disciplinary synergies among political economy scholars and fill the need for a regular meeting place, the USC PIPE Collaborative hosted the First Annual Political Institutions and Political Economy Conference on March 15-16, convening major U.S. scholars from political science, economics, and law to cover important new research on topics such as the unilateral presidency, Congressional committees, city policies, electoral rules, political leadership, and partisanship.

December 2, 2017

Nearly 20 years ago, Stanford Professor Keith Krehbiel wrote a book showing that political parties are less important in legislative-executive politics than previously thought — challenging previous assumptions of American politics and influencing the work of many up-and-coming scholars. USC Price School of Public Policy Provost Professor Jeffery Jenkins was completing graduate school when Krehbiel released Pivotal Politics: A Theory of U.S. Lawmaking in 1998.

November 22, 2010
November 9, 2010

Governance Salon, featuring Laurence J. O’Toole, University of Georgia November 8, 2010 Laurence J. O’Toole, is the Margaret Hughes and Robert T. Golembiewski Professor of Public Administration and a Distinguished…