Pamela Ban

Jeff Jenkins talks with Pamela Ban, UC San Diego about her recent research. First, she looks at how policy outcomes might change as Congress has a bit more gender representations. Then they discuss the revolving door and lobbying – how the cool off period has affected the lobbying industry. Finally, she thinks about how to use empirical data from newspapers to think about political power.

Bedrosian Director wins journal award for analysis of American West settlers

By Matthew Kredell

In the early history of the United States, settlers moved west into unsurveyed land and built homes and farms without regard to land title.

As the country expanded, one of the federal government’s chief means of acquiring revenue was the sale of public land. When the government put land up for auction, frontier settlers were at risk of losing their homes or farms.

Gregory DeAngelo

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks about human trafficking with Greg DeAngelo, Associate Professor of Economic Studies at Claremont Graduate University. How does an economist get data on human trafficking, and other black market enterprises? What are the pressing questions law enforcement have that academics could help?

D. Roderick (Rod) Kiewiet

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and D. Roderick (Rod) Kiewiet, Professor of Political Science at Caltech, break down the long standing myth of the equalizing force of public education. We hold the idea that public schools present Americans with equal opportunity. Kiewiet gets to the reality through public school funding in California compared to the nation.

Bonus – Interview with E. Glen Weyl

An interview with one of the co-authors of Radical Markets: Uprooting Capitalism and Democracy for a Just Society, E. Glen Weyl. (Follow Glen on Twitter: @glenweyl)

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of this bonus interview with E. Glen Weyl, click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloudGoogle PlayStitcher or your favorite podcasting app!

First annual political institutions, economy conference highlights cross-disciplinary collaboration

With the goal of fostering cross-disciplinary synergies among political economy scholars and fill the need for a regular meeting place, the USC PIPE Collaborative hosted the First Annual Political Institutions and Political Economy Conference on March 15-16, convening major U.S. scholars from political science, economics, and law to cover important new research on topics such as the unilateral presidency, Congressional committees, city policies, electoral rules, political leadership, and partisanship.

‘Parties & Partisanship in the Age of Trump’ symposium gathers scholars nationwide at USC Bedrosian Center

According to Bedrosian Center Director Jeffery Jenkins, “there are few issues more important today than partisanship. We live in a world today where partisan divisions run so deep that some of the most basic things we expect from government aren’t being done.  People inside and outside of Congress are more interested in skewering the other side rather than work together or find common ground.”

PIPE* Workshop: Steven Liao, UCRiverside

PIPE* Workshop: Steven Liao, UCRiverside
Tuesday, January 23 at 12:00pm to 1:30pm

 RSVP for location

Foreign Real Estate Investment and Incumbent Party Support in the U.S.

Few economic issues affect people as personally and universally as housing. Yet despite the increasing globalization of housing markets, little is known about its effect on political behavior. This study explores how Chinese investments in U.S. residential property shaped support for the incumbent party.