White Fragility

Host Aubrey Hicks is joined by professors Chris Redfearn and Liz Falletta in a discussion of the New York Times bestselling book White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo.

On today’s podcast, we talk about how white fragility works to sustain and reproduce the racist institutions & socialization which we all inherited.

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Us (dir. Jordan Peele)

From the mind the brought us Get Out, is the new film scaring audiences across the states. In Jordan Peele’s latest film, Us, doppelgängers menace a family trying to enjoy their summer vacation. But … as in Get Out, everything isn’t quite that simple. Warning: Spoilers!

What mirror is Peele holding up for us now?

White Identity and the Emergence of the Republican Party in the Early-20th Century South

by Casey Fischl

Jeffery A. Jenkins discussed his research paper, White Identity and the Emergence of the Republican Party in the Early-20th Century South, co-authored with Boris Heersink (Fordham University). The paper explores the relationship between white identity, the GOP, and the South

American Sonnets for my Past and Future Assassin

This month, Lisa, Richard, and Aubrey discuss the new book of sonnets from Terrance Hayes, American Sonnets for my Past and Future Assassin. Hayes’ sonnets are “acrid with tear gas, and they unravel with desire.” For the poetry doubters everywhere.

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of American Sonnets, click the arrow in the player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcastsSoundcloud, Spotify, or your favorite podcasting app!

Political Scientists Gather to Examine the Interplay of Race & Law Enforcement

Political scientists have increasingly turned their attention to understanding the politics, consequences, and implications of race and law enforcement. Panelists at the recent PIPE Symposium on Race & Law Enforcement presented cutting edge work on police-community relations, the implications of police violence for democracy, and the gaps in political representation often faced by people of color.

LaGina Gause

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and LaGina Gause, Assistant Professor of Political Science at UC San Diego, discuss the pro-democracy (small d) results of her study on legislative responsiveness to collective action by marginalized groups.

White People Calling The Police On Black People Is Not New

National Public Radio highlighted commentary by Jody Armour of the USC Gould School in a story on the problems of people calling the police unnecessarily in racially charged situations. “You have an alarming tendency of white people starting to use 911 as their kind of customer service line when they have any friction with a black person,” said Armour. NPR posted the transcript of the radio story as a separate article here.