Philip Potter

In this episode, Jeff Jenkins’s guest is Philip Potter, Associate Professor of Politics (UVA), and the Founding Director of the National Security Policy Center. Potter’s work looks at how public opinion effects foreign policy, when do policymakers have leeway, and when does public opinion constrain policy?

White Identity and the Emergence of the Republican Party in the Early-20th Century South

by Casey Fischl

Jeffery A. Jenkins discussed his research paper, White Identity and the Emergence of the Republican Party in the Early-20th Century South, co-authored with Boris Heersink (Fordham University). The paper explores the relationship between white identity, the GOP, and the South

Boris Heersink

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and political Boris Heersink, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Fordham University, look at the national party committees. What kind of power do the national committees have? What is the role of the committees, outside of the conventions? What role does the President play?

Researchers gather to discuss methods for causal arguments in the study of the history of American Politics

by Nathan K. Micatka and Nicholas Napolio 

While the field of political science may seem staid to outsiders, it has evolved significantly in terms of research methods over the last 40 years. The behaviorally based studies that dominated in the 1970s gave rise to the subfield of American Political Development (APD) in the 1980s as a way to more fully realize and incorporate the study of history and institutions. APD scholars made narrative-based causal arguments to understand the history of American politics. Over the past decade, a trend toward more data-oriented studies of causal relationships has emerged …

Gregory DeAngelo

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks about human trafficking with Greg DeAngelo, Associate Professor of Economic Studies at Claremont Graduate University. How does an economist get data on human trafficking, and other black market enterprises? What are the pressing questions law enforcement have that academics could help?

D. Roderick (Rod) Kiewiet

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and D. Roderick (Rod) Kiewiet, Professor of Political Science at Caltech, break down the long standing myth of the equalizing force of public education. We hold the idea that public schools present Americans with equal opportunity. Kiewiet gets to the reality through public school funding in California compared to the nation.

Political Scientists Gather to Examine the Interplay of Race & Law Enforcement

Political scientists have increasingly turned their attention to understanding the politics, consequences, and implications of race and law enforcement. Panelists at the recent PIPE Symposium on Race & Law Enforcement presented cutting edge work on police-community relations, the implications of police violence for democracy, and the gaps in political representation often faced by people of color.

LaGina Gause

In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and LaGina Gause, Assistant Professor of Political Science at UC San Diego, discuss the pro-democracy (small d) results of her study on legislative responsiveness to collective action by marginalized groups.

Scholars convene on methods and trends in subnational policy making research

“The study of state and local politics has taken off over the last decade. Data, methods, and research interests have evolved. There are a variety of important questions that can’t be examined well at the Federal level, because of severe case limitations.  But scholars can get leverage on these questions thanks to the sizable and interesting variation that exists at the state and local levels,” said Jeff Jenkins as he brought together scholars from across the nation to examine the study of subnational policy making.