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Green, Harris, and Orlando publish new paper to improve healthcare for elders

by Olivia Olson
Falling is the number one cause of injury and seventh leading cause of death in adults ages 65 and older. Over a quarter of that population falls annually, with approximately a third of those falls resulting in medical treatment or lifestyle changes. Unfortunately, however, today’s elderly are the most indebted in history and frequently lack the resources to invest in the non-urgent measures?“devices to call for help, grab bars, ramps, shower seats, and other modifications for wheelchair accessibility”?that would allow them to safely age in place and minimize the severity of falls.

Image of a woman sad expression

Invisible Burdens

by Katie Bonnett Women are taking on more stress than is necessary in the household. This comes from a difference in the responsibilities of hetero-sexual household members. When the work balance between couples gets to be too disproportionate, it creates stress on the person who does more work. Often, the Read more…

Indian Territory (1999) by Alexander Volkov

Democracy is a Process

by Aubrey L. Hicks, Executive Director, Bedrosian Center Democracy isn’t a state of being, it is a process. To be democratic, to live in democracy, is to participate boldly with our neighbors in governance. What we saw this week is evidence of anti-democratic movements across the country. Dr. Erroll Southers, Read more…

December 2020 Read

Author Matthew Hongoltz-Hetling takes us to Grafton, NH and a libertarian experiment called the Free Town Project. What happens when government doesn’t exist? When Americans want to live in a freedom without constraint, when regulations are ignored, when laws are ignored … does the community thrive? Perhaps the title gives Read more…

November 2020 Read

For the last five months, our most popular episode is our discussion of White Fragility. So … we wanted to bring the conversation further. As, the publisher writes on the blurb for Claudia Rankine’s Just Us, “Claudia Rankine’s Citizen changed the conversation–Just Us urges all of us into it.” Rankine’s Read more…

October 2020 Book Pick

Read our October “Bedrosian Bookclub” pick with us!

Joan Samson’s The Auctioneer is a classic of rural American horror. The novel has been compared to Shirley Jackson’s “The Lotter,” and inspired Stephen King’s Needful Things. Travel back to the 70s with us to a farming community in New Hampshire. We couldn’t put it down.

Food Insecurity and COVID-19

Expansion and Permanent Funding of the Highly Effective SNAP Program Will Help Low-Income Families and Provide Immediate Economic Stimulus by Katie Bonnett and Rhys Richmond What is SNAP and How Does it Work Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides direct, targeted financial support to improve access to nutritional food for Read more…

Call for submissions 2020

To support our mission to give opportunities for Native American and non-Native students to learn, collaborate, study, and amplify the stories of indigenous peoples, USC Bedrosian Center & Red Nation Celebration Institute are accepting submissions of full length plays written by American Indian/Indigenous authors.

Federalism, Public Policy, and Politics

he USC Price School of Public Policy and the Bedrosian Center on Governance are honored and excited to welcome Jamila Michener as our special guest for this month’s Price Governance Salon. She will be discussing her new book, Fragmented Democracy: Medicaid, Federalism and Unequal Politics. This book looks at Medicaid: America’s public health insurance program as a key example of how federalism plays out in policymaking and how drastically different it is implemented at the state level.