Community Engagement Post #2: On being genuine and building trust

Building trust is paramount for genuine community engagement

As I mentioned in our first community engagement post, Arnstein’s article on citizen participation (1969) shows us that there are wrong and illegitimate ways to do community or stakeholder engagement. In my research and my classes at Price, I’ve found that the first step to a legitimate process seems to be a legitimate desire by the engager to listen to the stakeholders and take their input into account when making decisions.

Washington Post CEO underscores media’s role in ensuring public accountability

“It’s wrong to conflate unfavorable news with fake news,” Ryan said. “There’s been troubling instances where fair but critical reporting by respected news organizations have been unfairly challenged as fake news. Wrongly applying the fake news label is an attack on the truth. It’s reckless and corrosive to our democracy when elected officials attempt to deliberately and systematically erode the credibility of news organizations because they object to factually accurate reporting.”

We need female leaders

In her latest blog post, Jue Song, discusses how representation of women in leadership roles is important.

Women have a proven track of record of excellent leadership. For example, research has shown that in India, the number of drinking water projects in women-led areas was 62% higher than in those with men-led councils. Similarly, a direct positive causal relationship between the presence of women in municipal councils and childcare coverage was found in Norway.

USC Price convenes LA County’s seven female police chiefs, who share personal, career insights

For the first time in its 167-year history, Los Angeles County has seven female police chiefs leading local law enforcement agencies. The USC Price School of Public Policy brought together all seven police chiefs on March 15 for a special discussion titled, “When Women Lead: Breaking Barriers, Building Communities.”

Announcing Policy at the Playhouse Partnership

Policy at the Playhouse began as an initiative at the USC Bedrosian Center with the idea that conversations about governance happen in many different forms and must be voiced by many different communities. Because the School of Dramatic Arts is steeped in the language and voices of artists in the field, this partnership will allow the program to grow and deepen within the USC community. The initiative will provide conversations about theatrical productions on and off campus, as well as create a new podcast of the same name to bring conversations about Angeleno theatre to off-campus audiences.

Cheers to Raphael Bostic, who will serve as president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

We are pleased to congratulate Professor Raphael Bostic on his appointment as president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. This appointment is felt by our community as both as a significant gain for the Federal Reserve and the southeastern region (given Raphael’s combination of policy experience, government service, and his distinguished academic record) and…

Turning the Corner: Progress Is Not Dead, Trump Is Not the Future

PhD candidate, Anthony Orlando, writes an op-ed about Los Angeles voters and Measure S within the larger political context:

The voters of Los Angeles have taken a stand—and the world should pay heed.

“Measure S,” the ballot initiative defeated in yesterday’s election, was not just a local issue. True, it would only have halted high-rise construction in one city. But like Brexit, like the election of Donald Trump, its effect would have been global.

Is Solidifying Borders the Answer to the Migrant Crisis in Europe?

2nd year MPP candidate, Robyn Burleson, tackles the growing refugee crisis in this overview piece.

The European Union is struggling to mitigate Europe’s refugee crisis as migrants flee civil wars and poverty in Syria, Iraq, and other nations caught up in domestic upheavals. Approximately 60 million people have been displaced because of conflicts around the world, the largest number of displaced people since World War 2. More than one million migrants traveled to Europe in 2015 alone, and Syria is the largest source of those refugees. The numbers of refugees continue to climb as civil wars escalate, and the majority of the migrants are arriving in Greece, Italy, and Turkey.