Political Scientists Gather to Examine the Interplay of Race & Law Enforcement

Political scientists have increasingly turned their attention to understanding the politics, consequences, and implications of race and law enforcement. Panelists at the recent PIPE Symposium on Race & Law Enforcement presented cutting edge work on police-community relations, the implications of police violence for democracy, and the gaps in political representation often faced by people of color.

Corn-Fed : Taking stalk of the government’s role in industrialized corn

by Olivia Rae Olson

Not on a cob. Not served with peas. But in your soft drinks, condiments, fast food, and salad dressing. The term ‘corn-fed’ once harkened back to Midwestern children with rosy cheeks, but has taken on a whole new meaning with the pervasiveness of industrialized corn.

Why not Evidence-Based Medicine?

Former President John F. Kennedy said: “Mothers all want their sons to grow up to be president, but they don’t want them to become politicians in the process.” I would add mothers also want their sons to be doctors. In terms of medical care, when your doctor stands in opposition to your political representative, which…

Unsavory pork & decentralization

by Pamela Clouser McCann

We ask the question: what are the conditions under which legislators would vote against fiscal transfers to their states?  We argue that members of Congress, who care about the ability to claim credit and show their constituents they are fighting for their interests, think carefully about their intergovernmental context and the fact that executive branch agencies disseminate federal dollars and implement federal programs.

How will the Michael Cohen and Duncan Hunter scandals affect the November election? Here’s what our research finds.

The Washington Post published commentary by Abby Wood of the USC Gould School and Christian Grose of the USC Dornsife College on whether elected officials who violate campaign finance laws will be punished at the polls. The authors turned to the post-Watergate era when campaign finance violations were often in the headlines. Violations at that time told voters that a candidate was, at worst, corrupt or, at best, a disorganized manager, the authors wrote.

Our current political climate has enough parallels to the Watergate era that we suspect voters will react negatively to campaign finance violations again. We will find out Nov. 6.

Lewis named 2018 USC community achievement honoree for promoting cultural competency inside classroom and beyond

Toward the end of the spring semester, representatives from three university student organizations showed up at a class taught by USC Price School of Public Policy Professor LaVonna Lewis and announced she had been chosen as the recipient of the 2018 Student Government Community Achievement Award.

Scholars convene on methods and trends in subnational policy making research

“The study of state and local politics has taken off over the last decade. Data, methods, and research interests have evolved. There are a variety of important questions that can’t be examined well at the Federal level, because of severe case limitations.  But scholars can get leverage on these questions thanks to the sizable and interesting variation that exists at the state and local levels,” said Jeff Jenkins as he brought together scholars from across the nation to examine the study of subnational policy making.

USC Price student-led forum focuses on issues of identity, resistance

“In order for us to be inclusive, we need to really highlight that representation matters and include as many people, organizations, thought processes and concerns that people may have,” said Malaika Merid, a second-year Master of Public Policy Student at USC Price who was one of the event organizers. “This is a gathering space of real diverse thought, and I think that the best way for us to move forward with that is to keep creating ways to find more diversity of thought to be included within the forum.”