Dr. Mosqueda on social justice in medicine at USC Keck

Mosqueda has helped heal USC’s medical school and has worked to integrate social justice into the school’s mission. In her short time as Dean, Mosqueda has revamped the curriculum, created a new position that focuses solely on social justice, and is prioritizing diversity in both her staff and students.

White Identity and the Emergence of the Republican Party in the Early-20th Century South

by Casey Fischl

Jeffery A. Jenkins discussed his research paper, White Identity and the Emergence of the Republican Party in the Early-20th Century South, co-authored with Boris Heersink (Fordham University). The paper explores the relationship between white identity, the GOP, and the South

USC Price alumna Brettany Shannon follows her authentic path, including co-editing book on authenticity and community development

By Cristy Lytal

According to Brettany Shannon, media arts and digital communications are playing increasingly important roles in community development. And as the first Scholar-in-Residence at the Bedrosian Center at the USC Price School of Public Policy, she’s exploring this topic through a variety of media ranging from an edited book to an Instagram database to a podcast.

Researchers gather to discuss methods for causal arguments in the study of the history of American Politics

by Nathan K. Micatka and Nicholas Napolio 

While the field of political science may seem staid to outsiders, it has evolved significantly in terms of research methods over the last 40 years. The behaviorally based studies that dominated in the 1970s gave rise to the subfield of American Political Development (APD) in the 1980s as a way to more fully realize and incorporate the study of history and institutions. APD scholars made narrative-based causal arguments to understand the history of American politics. Over the past decade, a trend toward more data-oriented studies of causal relationships has emerged …

Snap Peas and Socioeconomic Inequality: the role of farmers’ markets in addressing food insecurity

by Olivia Olson

40 million Americans live in a state of perpetual uncertainty. Food insecurity, the condition that plagues these 40 million, leaves them without consistent access to healthy food or the resources to feed themselves and their families. This hardship manifests itself differently across income brackets and geographical locationsforcing families to skip meals, eat less and with less frequency, depend on unhealthy food options, or struggle to find their next meal.

Potter on Political Violence in China

by Casey Fischl

Philip Potter discussed his research paper, “Political Violence in China: Terrorism, Official Media, and Political Priorities,” during the January 15, 2019 PIPE Workshop. His research focuses on terrorism and counterterrorism in China, to answer the question of why it is critical that the United States begins to pay more attention to the current state of affairs in China.

An unHappy Meal: how government spending forced reliance on fast food

by Olivia Olson

Those living in poverty are among the victims of a system that renders fast food and other such unhealthy products the only viable options for low-income citizens. From commodity crop subsidies, to federal programs that place fast food in the heart of urban areas, obesity is not “a moral lapse of a brain chemical but the effect of poverty.”