Category: Blog

February 26, 2019

by Casey Fischl

Chad Kendall discussed his paper, Unbundling Polarization, co-authored by Nathan Canen and Francesco Trebbi. His research investigates political polarization, an issue that is at an all-time high for Western democracies.

February 12, 2019

by Casey Fischl

Anthony Orlando discussed one of his current research projects, When Citizens Peek Behind the Bureaucratic Veil: An Experiment in Shaping Public Opinion, coauthored by Professor Bill Resh and Ph.D. student, Colin Leslie of the Sol Price School of Public Policy.

February 12, 2019
January 31, 2019

Mosqueda has helped heal USC’s medical school and has worked to integrate social justice into the school’s mission. In her short time as Dean, Mosqueda has revamped the curriculum, created a new position that focuses solely on social justice, and is prioritizing diversity in both her staff and students.

January 29, 2019

by Nathan K. Micatka and Nicholas Napolio

While the field of political science may seem staid to outsiders, it has evolved significantly in terms of research methods over the last 40 years. The behaviorally based studies that dominated in the 1970s gave rise to the subfield of American Political Development (APD) in the 1980s as a way to more fully realize and incorporate the study of history and institutions. APD scholars made narrative-based causal arguments to understand the history of American politics. Over the past decade, a trend toward more data-oriented studies of causal relationships has emerged …

January 29, 2019

By Cristy Lytal

According to Brettany Shannon, media arts and digital communications are playing increasingly important roles in community development. And as the first Scholar-in-Residence at the Bedrosian Center at the USC Price School of Public Policy, she’s exploring this topic through a variety of media ranging from an edited book to an Instagram database to a podcast.

January 28, 2019

by Olivia Olson

40 million Americans live in a state of perpetual uncertainty. Food insecurity, the condition that plagues these 40 million, leaves them without consistent access to healthy food or the resources to feed themselves and their families. This hardship manifests itself differently across income brackets and geographical locations?forcing families to skip meals, eat less and with less frequency, depend on unhealthy food options, or struggle to find their next meal.

January 15, 2019

by Casey Fischl

Philip Potter discussed his research paper, “Political Violence in China: Terrorism, Official Media, and Political Priorities,” during the January 15, 2019 PIPE Workshop. His research focuses on terrorism and counterterrorism in China, to answer the question of why it is critical that the United States begins to pay more attention to the current state of affairs in China.

December 18, 2018
December 6, 2018
November 19, 2018
November 19, 2018
October 23, 2018

Two former Congressmen discussed opportunities for bipartisan leadership and how to build political consensus. By: Yuming Fang Originally posted at USC Annenberg Media, October 22 at 5:12 PM Two men who…

October 15, 2018

by Shuaifeng Yao Former President John F. Kennedy said: “Mothers all want their sons to grow up to be president, but they don’t want them to become politicians in the process.”…

September 21, 2018

by Pamela Clouser McCann Bridges to nowhere, airports named for legislators, and construction signage regarding taxpayer dollars at work—these are typical accoutrements of legislative office.  Showing your constituents what you…