Bedrosian Director wins journal award for analysis of American West settlers

By Matthew Kredell

In the early history of the United States, settlers moved west into unsurveyed land and built homes and farms without regard to land title.

As the country expanded, one of the federal government’s chief means of acquiring revenue was the sale of public land. When the government put land up for auction, frontier settlers were at risk of losing their homes or farms.

A spoonful less sugar helps the obesity rates go down

by Olivia Olson

While consumers frequently vilify fat, salt, or red meat, most fail to acknowledge sugar’s role in obesity and overweight. In the past 60 years of increased health consciousness, sugar has managed to largely avoid blame, and indeed increase its presence in a wide variety of ‘fat free,’ ‘gluten free,’ or ‘all natural’ ‘health foods.’

Kim Simon

by Casey Fischl

Kim Simon is the Managing Director of the USC Shoah Foundation – The Institute for Visual History and Education, which manages one of the largest digital collections of its kind in the world. Kim has been with the Institute since its start in 1994 and has played a key role in the development and implementation of public engagement programs that connect USC Shoah Foundation to many audiences.

Unbundling Polarization

by Casey Fischl

Chad Kendall discussed his paper, Unbundling Polarization, co-authored by Nathan Canen and Francesco Trebbi. His research investigates political polarization, an issue that is at an all-time high for Western democracies.

Dr. Mosqueda on social justice in medicine at USC Keck

Mosqueda has helped heal USC’s medical school and has worked to integrate social justice into the school’s mission. In her short time as Dean, Mosqueda has revamped the curriculum, created a new position that focuses solely on social justice, and is prioritizing diversity in both her staff and students.

White Identity and the Emergence of the Republican Party in the Early-20th Century South

by Casey Fischl

Jeffery A. Jenkins discussed his research paper, White Identity and the Emergence of the Republican Party in the Early-20th Century South, co-authored with Boris Heersink (Fordham University). The paper explores the relationship between white identity, the GOP, and the South

USC Price alumna Brettany Shannon follows her authentic path, including co-editing book on authenticity and community development

By Cristy Lytal

According to Brettany Shannon, media arts and digital communications are playing increasingly important roles in community development. And as the first Scholar-in-Residence at the Bedrosian Center at the USC Price School of Public Policy, she’s exploring this topic through a variety of media ranging from an edited book to an Instagram database to a podcast.

Researchers gather to discuss methods for causal arguments in the study of the history of American Politics

by Nathan K. Micatka and Nicholas Napolio 

While the field of political science may seem staid to outsiders, it has evolved significantly in terms of research methods over the last 40 years. The behaviorally based studies that dominated in the 1970s gave rise to the subfield of American Political Development (APD) in the 1980s as a way to more fully realize and incorporate the study of history and institutions. APD scholars made narrative-based causal arguments to understand the history of American politics. Over the past decade, a trend toward more data-oriented studies of causal relationships has emerged …